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Princeton University Concerts Announces 2012-2013 Season

04/06/2012

 

At a sold-out performance last month, James Camner, a Princeton local and a new subscriber to Princeton University Concerts, remarked “I can’t remember ever subscribing to anything  - including the Metropolitan Opera and Philadelphia Orchestra - that has been so consistently excellent as this year’s Princeton University Concerts season.”  Building on that success, which has attracted capacity audiences, Princeton University Concerts (“PUC”) is pleased to announce the details of its 2012-2013 season.   Once again, PUC will offer a variety of programs, including three of the finest string quartets in the world today, one of the world’s great English choirs, two chamber orchestras with very different approaches and a concert bringing together master pianist Richard Goode and poet C.K. Williams.  From Great Britain and Germany to Poland and Carnegie Hall, the offerings of “PUC” represent a diverse and international array of the best of today’s classical musicians.  Most of the concerts will be presented in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, regarded as one of the most exceptional acoustics for classical music in the country.  PUC will present 15 concerts, including 3 special events, and its Richardson Chamber Players series. 

 

The 2012-2013 season opens with the Takács String Quartet.  They come to Princeton in the same season that they assume the prestigious role of Associate Artists at the famed Wigmore Hall in London, a new long-term position awarded to a senior internationally acclaimed ensemble who will be central to Wigmore’s programming.  Closing the season, PUC builds on a concept started in the current season with countertenor David Daniels and choreographer Mark Morris - pairing artists across discipline for a one-of-a-kind evening.  In this event, pianist Richard Goode will collaborate with Princeton’s own Pulitzer prize-winning poet C.K. Williams in a program that will include solo piano music and poetry read from the stage by Williams.   In between, 6 musicians will make their PUC debuts, including a recital by the young Polish piano virtuoso Rafal Blechacz and a rare duo performance by mezzo-soprano Angelika Kirchschlager and tenor Ian Bostridge, who will appear in only 3 venues in the United States next year (Alice Tully Hall in New York, The Kimmel Center in Philadelphia and Princeton).  The series will also explore two different themes:  the relationship between words, music and song in three very different programs, and the art of the piano in the course of three diverse recitals.  A special event will mark the 100th anniversary of Woodrow Wilson’s presidency of the United States and violinist Julia Fischer, who dazzled PUC audiences this season, will return with a solo recital.  PUC’s Director, Marna Seltzer, says “Princeton University Concerts has presented the world’s most commanding performers since 1894. Next year’s series continues to build on that tradition while spotlighting artists new to Princeton audiences and expanding the framework that has made PUC’s 11-12 season a critical and audience success. We will continue to feature programs that bring together our loyal adult concert-going community with younger audience, and Princeton students in particular, a cross section that makes going to a PUC concert unique.”

 

Some of the 8 subscription concerts will be preceded by talks given by a variety of speakers, including the popular Princeton professor Scott Burnham who charmed PUC audiences this season.  Others will be preceded by musical previews played by talented Princeton students, a feature new to PUC’s current season. 

 

Subscriptions are now on sale for the 2012-2013 season.  PUC continues to offer one of the lowest ticket prices in town to hear remarkable artists up close and personal in the intimacy of Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  PUC will offer several different subscription packages making it easier to subscribe.  Single tickets will go on sale Tuesday, September 4.  For more information, contact the PUC concert office at 609-258-2800.

 

 

THE 2012-2013 SEASON

(Organized by series, then chronologically)

 

CONCERT CLASSICS SERIES

The cornerstone of the PUC season, offered as the full subscription of 8 concerts or as smaller concert packages, features the pillars of classical music performed by today’s most renowned artists.  All concerts take place on Thursday nights in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, unless otherwise noted.

 

*indicates Princeton University Concerts debut

 

 

Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

TAKáCS STRING QUARTET

 

Schubert String Quartet No.13 in A Minor, D. 804 (“Rosamunde”)

Britten String Quartet No. 2 in C Major

Dvorak String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96 (“American”)

 

Recognized as one of the world’s great ensembles, the Takács Quartet plays with a unique blend of drama, warmth and humor, combining four distinct musical personalities to bring fresh insights to the string quartet repertoire.  John Gilhooly, Director of Wigmore Hall, recently announced that from the 2012-13 season, the Takács Quartet will be Associate Artists at the Hall. This is a new position which is awarded on a long-term basis to senior internationally acclaimed ensembles who will be central to the venue’s chamber music output over many years.  The Quartet is renowned for its exacting standards and hugely engaging performances, enjoying an unsurpassed reputation throughout Europe, the United States, Australia and Asia.

 

Thursday, November 8, 2012 at 8pm in Princeton University Chapel

TENEBRAE,* Britain’s premier chamber choir

NIGEL SHORT, Director

presented in collaboration with McCarter Theatre

 

Works by Rachmaninoff, Pärt and Paul Mealor

 

Tenebrae, a 17-voice British choir founded 10 years ago by Nigel Short, a former member of the King’s Singers, has established itself as the chamber choir of choice for critics and audiences in the UK and around the world. The group blends the passion of a large cathedral choir with the precision of a chamber ensemble to create a unique and enchanting sound, one which is as dazzlingly effective in medieval chant as it is in contemporary works. With every performance exploiting the unique acoustic and atmosphere of each venue in which they perform (in this case the gothic revival splendor of the Princeton University Chapel), the carefully chosen team of singers enable the audience to experience the power and intimacy of the human voice at its very best.  The ensemble is best known to American listeners through its recordings: about a dozen of its own (on the Signum Classics label). But a tour to the United States last spring (2011) caused the New York Times to write that “ if the group toured here as often as the Tallis Scholars, it could probably match — perhaps even draw on — that ensemble’s considerable following.”  Recently, two of Tenebrae’s recordings were nominated in the Choral category of the BBC Music Magazine Awards, the first time in the history of the awards that an ensemble has had two nominations in a single category.  The mixed program will include works by Paul Mealor who was catapulted to international attention when 2.5 billion people (the largest audience in broadcasting history) heard his Motet, Ubi caritas performed by the choirs of Westminster Abbey and Her Majesty’s Chapel Royal at the Royal Wedding Ceremony of His Royal Highness Prince William and Catherine Middleton (now TRH The Duke & Duchess of Cambridge) at Westminster Abbey.  For the first time in its history, PUC will move its audience to the Princeton University Chapel, the ideal venue for Tenebrae’s debut.  PUC is also pleased to highlight its connection to one of Tenebrae’s principal singers, Gabriel Crouch, Princeton’s much-loved Director of the Glee Club and Choral Program.

 

Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

ANGELIKA KIRCHSCHLAGER,* Mezzo-Soprano

IAN BOSTRIDGE,* Tenor

JULIUS DRAKE, Piano

 

HUGO WOLF’S Spanisches Liederbuch

 

Two of the world’s outstanding lieder interpreters explore the subtle nuance and beauty of the art of the song in this recital of thirty-four songs selected from Hugo Wolf’s Spanisches Liederbuch.  It’s hard to imagine singers better matched to reveal the profound emotional intensity of Wolf’s art and to remind us what a startlingly original composer of lieder he was.  Princeton audiences will be among the few in the country to hear this powerhouse duo who will sing this repertoire in only 3 venues next season, a testament to the PUC series and its concert venue that renowned musicians have flocked to for over a hundred years.

 

Thursday, February 21, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

THE ENGLISH CONCERT

HARRY BICKET, Director

 

Baroque Chamber Orchestra Masterpieces by Handel, Telemann and Purcell

 

In February 2013, Princeton will be the site of the American Handel Society’s bi-annual conference.  It is no coincidence that the English Concert known for, among other things, its interpretations of Handel will appear on the PUC series anchoring the American Handel Festival which will take place at Princeton during the conference.  The English Concert, returning to PUC after many years, is among the finest baroque chamber orchestras in the world, with an unsurpassed reputation for inspiring performances of Baroque and Classical music in the concert hall and on CD. Based in London, the orchestra presents an annual season there, in addition to extensive touring. In 2007 Harry Bicket became the orchestra’s Artistic Director, following in the steps of Andrew Manze and their founder, Trevor Pinnock. The English Concert’s many recordings include several prize-winners, most recently As steals the Morn, a CD of Handel arias with tenor Mark Padmore that received a 2008 BBC Music Magazine Award. The visit to Princeton precedes a concert performance of Handel’s opera Radamisto at Carnegie Hall, part of a larger concert opera project that was started last season and will feature The English Concert over several seasons in Carnegie Hall.

 

Thursday, March 14, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

ARTEMIS STRING QUARTET

 

Mendelssohn String Quartet No. 3 in D Major, Op. 44, No. 1

Bach Selections from The Art of the Fugue

Piazzolla Fugues

Mendelssohn  String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 80

 

The Berlin-based Artemis Quartet was founded at the Lübeck Musikhochschule in 1989. Walter Levin, the Emerson Quartet, the Juilliard Quartet and the Alban Berg Quartet have been and remain important teachers and mentors for the ensemble. Since 1994 the four players have performed as a professional ensemble, quickly gaining a reputation as one of the leading ensembles of their generation. Their international stature was established by winning First Prizes at the ARD Competition in 1996 and soon thereafter First Prize at the Premio Borciani. Rather than pitch themselves into the tempting fast track of career success, the members of the Artemis Quartet instead immersed themselves in further study.  In 1998 the ensemble spent a year in residence with the Alban Berg Quartet in Vienna followed by a three-month sabbatical at Berlin’s Wissenschaftskolleg. Their debut at the Berlin Philharmonie in June of 1999 marked the formal start of their career. A new phase of the chamber group’s life began in July 2007 when Gregor Sigl and Friedemann Weigle became members of the quartet.   Since 2004 the quartet’s series of concerts at the Berlin Philharmonie has met with high praise from critics and audiences alike. From the 2011-12 season onwards the ensemble is “quartet-in-residence” at the Konzerthaus in Vienna.

 

Thursday, April 4, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

ELIAS STRING QUARTET*

 

Haydn Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 64, No. 6

Janacek Quartet No. 2 (“Intimate Letters”)

Schumann Quartet in A Minor, Op. 41, No. 1

 

The Elias String Quartet take their name from Mendelssohn’s oratorio, Elijah, of which Elias is in its German form.  A relative newcomer on the quartet scene, they have quickly established themselves as one of the most intense and vibrant quartets of their generation. They perform around the world, collaborating with many different artists.  The Quartet was formed in 1998 at the Royal Northern College of Music in Manchester where they worked closely with the late Dr. Christopher Rowland. They also spent a year studying at the Hochschule in Cologne with the Alban Berg quartet. Other mentors in the Quartet’s studies include Hugh Maguire, György Kurtág, Gábor Takács-Nagy, Henri Dutilleux and Rainer Schmidt of the Hagen Quartet.  The quartet has been chosen to participate in BBC Radio 3’s prestigious New Generation Artists’ scheme and is the recipient of a 2010 Borletti-Buitoni Trust Award. In April 2010, their disc of Mendelssohn, Mozart and Schubert on the Wigmore Hall Live label was given the BBC Music Magazine Newcomer Award.  This year they had their debut at the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam and a week long tour in Europe with pianist Jonathan Biss. Future projects include a five-concert series at Wigmore Hall, a US tour including their Carnegie Hall debut, returning to the Concertgebouw in Amsterdam, and participating in Jonathan Biss’s Schumann project at Carnegie Hall.

 

Thursday, April 25, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

RAFAL BLECHACZ, Piano*

 

Bach Partita No. 3 in A Minor, BWV 827

Beethoven Sonata in D Major, Op. 10, #3

Debussy Suite Bergamasque

Szymanowski Sonata No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 8

In October 2005 Rafal Blechacz was the uncontested winner of the 15th Frédéric Chopin International Piano Competition in Warsaw, Poland.  In addition to the Grand Prize, Mr. Blechacz won all the special prizes of the Competition: the Polish Radio Prize for best mazurka performance, the Frédéric Chopin Society Prize for the best performance of a polonaise, the National Philharmonic of Poland Prize for the best concerto performance, and the Krystian Zimerman-sponsored prize for the best performance of a sonata.   In July 2010 he received the prestigious Premio Internazionale Accademia Musicale Chigiana (Siena, Italy), awarded annually by an international jury of music critics to young musicians for superb artistic achievements.  On May 29, 2006, Rafal Blechacz signed an exclusive recording contract with Deutsche Grammophon, thus becoming only the second Polish artist, after Krystian Zimerman, to be signed to the prestigious label.  His first recording of the Chopin Preludes, honoring the Chopin anniversary year of 2010, received a “Best of the Year” honor from Gramophone Magazine, and the Preis der Deutschen Schalplattenkritik, a prestigious recognition from Germany’s music critics.  The recording quickly achieved double platinum status in Poland. 

 

 

 

 

Thursday, May 9, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

RICHARD GOODE, Piano

C.K. WILLIAMS, Poet*

 

Beethoven Sonata No. 31 in A-flat Major, Op. 110

Selections from Janacek “On an Overgrown Path”

Other works by Beethoven, Brahms and Chopin

 

Following on the heels of the collaboration between choreographer Mark Morris and countertenor David Daniels, the season finale brings together a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet who calls Princeton his home with a musician who has been acknowledged worldwide as one of today’s leading interpreters of classical music.  The two artists, both poets of their craft, have jointly selected a program that pairs C.K. Williams’ words with Richard’s Goode’s musical interpretations.  Hailed by poet Paul Muldoon as “one of the most distinguished poets of his generation,” C.K. Williams has created a highly respected body of work, including many collections of original poems, volumes of translation, several books of criticism and a memoir.  His love for music shows up in many of his poems and springs partly from a childhood of piano lessons.   His musical partner for the evening, Richard Goode, shares a love of poetry and is known for a very personal approach to music that has led the New York Times to call him “a poet of the piano.”  This special program will be performed with poetry read by C.K. Williams between piano works and will be offered only in Princeton. 

 

 

RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented Princeton students. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sundays at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium.  Each concert features informal commentary from prominent hosts, exploring the themes of each concert.

 

Sunday, November 11, 2012 at 3:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

“MUSIC FOR A WHILE,” all-Purcell program

 

Players include: Nancy Wilson and Vita Wallace, Baroque violins; Wendy Young, harpsichord, Vivian Barton, cello & gamba; Julianne Baird, soprano

 

 

 

 

Sunday, February 17, 2013 at 3:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

 

“BACHIANAS & MORE”

Villa-Lobos Bachianas Brasilieras No. 6 for Flute and Bassoon

KURT WEILL Frauentanz, 7 Poems from the Middle Ages, Op. 10 for Soprano and Instruments

Hindemith Die Junge Magd, Song cycle for Mezzo-soprano, Flute, Clarinet, and String quartet, Op.23b

Villa-Lobos Bachianas Brasilieras No. 5 for Soprano and an Orchestra of Cellos

 

Players include: Jo-Ann Sternberg, clarinet; Martha Elliott, soprano; and Barbara Rearick, mezzo-soprano

 

Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 3:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

 

“SOMETHING SLAVIC”

BARTOK Romanian Folk Dances for Violin and Piano

RACHMANINOFF Vocalise for Viola and Piano

GYöRGY KURTáG Bach Transcriptions for Piano Four Hands

Chopin Polonaise Brillante for Cello and Piano

Dvorak Quintet for Piano and Strings, Op. 81

 

Players include: Margaret Kampmeier, piano and Tom Kraines, cello

 

 

SPECIAL EVENTS

 

Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 7:30PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

JULIA FISCHER, Violin

Back by Popular Demand!

 

BACH Solo Violin Partita No. 3 in E Major, BWV 1006

YSAŸE Solo Violin Sonata in A Minor, Op. 27, No. 2

BACH Solo Violin Sonata No. 1 in G Minor, BWV 1001

HINDEMITH Solo Violin Sonata in G Minor, Op. 11, No. 6

 

This past February Julia Fischer made her Princeton debut in Richardson Auditorium on the PUC subscription series.  Playing to a capacity crowd of subscribers, students and other music lovers, the audience was treated to a dazzling display of fiery technique, a rich sound that filled the hall and a musical journey that ended with a heartfelt encore of Ernst Bloch’s Nigun.  PUC audiences were lucky to hear a rare recital by a violinist who does not often perform in the United States.  Audiences will be luckier still to be one of two venues (the other is Carnegie Hall) in the United States where she will perform a solo recital next season before taking a hiatus from recital appearances in the United States.  This violinist is definitely back by popular demand, this time taking the stage on her own to tackle the fiendishly difficult solo violin repertory. 

 

Tuesday, February 12 at 7:30PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

a special double bill

ECCO, East Coast Chamber Orchestra*  & YOU

 

Mozart Divertimento in F Major, K. 138

Bartok Divertimento

plus... a community reading (piece TBD) with ECCO - all string players invited!

 

In 2001, a group of musicians – colleagues and friends from leading conservatories and music festivals across the country – collectively envisioned the creation of a democratically-run, self-conducted chamber orchestra that would thrive on the pure joy and camaraderie of classical music-making. This organic approach and high level of passion and commitment resulted in ECCO, a dynamic collective that combines the strength and power of a great orchestral ensemble with the personal involvement and sensitivity of superb chamber music. The ensemble’s debuts in New York’s Town Hall and The Kennedy Center confirmed its position as one of the most exceptional ensembles of today’s generation, whose fresh interpretations, coupled with passionate and joyous playing, have earned them standing ovations and re-engagements.  This special event, free to subscribers, builds on the huge success of the appearance by the ensemble Time for Three this season by showcasing a young ensemble with a fresh approach to music-making  (violinist Nick Kendall of Time for Three is a member of ECCO).  The concept for this concert, though, will be entirely new for PUC.  In an era where audience participation and feedback has become essential, we will celebrate the joy of music-making by inviting the audience to participate in the performance. As a special part of the evening, all string players will be invited to the stage to read a chamber orchestra work alongside the young players of ECCO.  Stay tuned for more details.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tuesday, April 9, 2013 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

INON BARNATAN, Piano

paderewski memorial concert

 

“HONORING WOODROW WILSON”

BEETHOVEN Thirty-two Variations in C Minor

BEETHOVEN Piano Sonata No. 21 in C Major, Op. 53 (“Waldstein”)

SCHUMANN Carnaval, Op. 9

CHOPIN Selected Pieces

ERNEST SCHELLING Nocturne a Raguse

STOJOWSKI By the Brookside

 

Israeli pianist Inon Barnatan caught the eye of Princeton audiences when he made his debut this fall with cellist Alisa Weilerstein.  He returns to Princeton to take part in a community-wide celebration of the Woodrow Wilson centenary, an occasion that marks the 100th anniversary of Wilson’s inauguration as President of the United States and will be celebrated by many local organizations.  For PUC’s contribution, we have asked Mr. Barnatan to recreate a program played by the legendary pianist Ignacy Paderewski.  Following World War I, Paderewski laid aside his concert career, holding the offices of Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Poland.  As such, he was a signer of the Treaty of Versailles, becoming friendly with Woodrow Wilson whose support had been influential in the establishment of Poland as an independent state.  In 1925, shortly after Wilson’s death, Paderewski visited Princeton, under the auspices of Princeton University Concerts, to play a recital in honor of Wilson.  Mr. Barnatan is perhaps the ideal pianist to bring this historic program back to life.  His interest in thematically-related programming recently led him to release his second solo recording called Darkness Visible.  The recording features wide-ranging inspired by other works of art.  On the recording Mr. Barnatan examines how different characteristics of darkness are represented in music.

 

*indicates Princeton University Concerts debut

 

 

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

 

FULL SUBSCRIPTIONS (the Best Deal)

 

Concert Classics Series

            8 concerts, save up to 30%

            A  $229, B  $179, C  $119

 

MAKE YOUR OWN SERIES

Choose 3 or more different concerts from all of our offerings and save 10% off the single ticket prices.

 

PUC prides itself on offering the chance to experience something new.  The packages below provide an alternative way to view the season and may be helpful as ticket buyers build their own series. 

 

Words, Music and Song

Tenebrae

Ian Bostridge/Angelika Kirchschlager

Goode/Williams

 

Next Generation

ECCO, East Coast Chamber Orchestra

Rafal Blechacz

Elias String Quartet

 

Art of the Piano

Inon Barnatan

Rafal Blechacz

Richard Goode

 

Blockbusters

Takács String Quartet

Julia Fischer

Ian Bostridge/Angelika Kirchschlager

 

The String Quartet

Takács String Quartet

Artemis String Quartet

Elias String Quartet

 

Sunday Afternoon Serenades

Richardson Chamber Players

 

 

 

Special Events

 

Julia Fischer, Violin

Add this event to a full Concert Classics subscription and receive a 20% discount off the single ticket prices.

 

ECCO, East Coast Chamber Orchestra

FREE for all full subscribers.  Limit one ticket per person.

 

Inon Barnatan, Piano  “Honoring Woodrow Wilson”

Add this event to a full Concert Classics subscription and receive a 20% discount off the single ticket prices.

 

Subscriptions can be bought by calling the Concert Office at 609-258-2800.  The Concert Office is open Monday through Friday, 10AM to 4PM.  Subscription information can also be submitted online at princetonuniversityconcerts.org.

 

For all questions, contact the Concert Office at 609-258-2800.

 

 

Valid from 04/06/2012 to 08/06/2012

 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS ANNOUNCES ITS 2011-2012 SEASON

04/04/2011

Three of the finest string quartets in the world today, three of the most sought-after young artists of their generation, and a concert bringing together dance and music for the first time in PUC’s 118-year history constitute the core of Princeton University’s Concerts (“PUC”)  2011-2012 concert season.  From Germany and Jerusalem to London and Carnegie Hall, the offerings of “PUC” represent a diverse and international array of the best of today’s classical musicians.  The concerts will be presented in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, regarded as one of the most exceptional acoustics for classical music in the country.  Building on its 117-year history, the offerings of PUC expand from 11 to 13 concerts, and introduce a new partnership with McCarter Theatre, a bonus concert featuring the eclectic ensemble Time for Three and an interdisciplinary collaboration between choreographer Mark Morris and countertenor David Daniels.  PUC continues to offer one of the lowest ticket prices in town to hear exceptional artists up close and personal in the intimacy of Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  

The 2011/2012 season opens with the Emerson String Quartet appearing on the series for the first time in 12 years.  They will be offering a program of works that explore the relationship between Music and Memory, part of a community-wide collaboration entitled “Memory and the Work of Art.”  Closing the season, the greatest choreographer of his generation - Mark Morris - and perhaps the greatest countertenor of any generation - David Daniels - continue a partnership that began with Gluck’s Orfeo ed Eurdice at the Metropolitan Opera. The choreographed recital includes the grief-stricken Orfeo’s aria “Che Faro,” the plaintive beauty of which moves Amor to bring Eurydice back to life.  At Princeton, Mr. Morris, who insists upon live music for all of his Company’s performances, will have one of the most intimate settings ever for his work.
In between, eleven musicians will make their PUC debuts, including a rare recital appearance by the young German violin virtuoso Julia Fischer and a performance by a cellist who many people feel is the next Jacqueline du Pre - Alisa Weilerstein.  The series also features a special program of holiday music sung by the celebrated Tallis Scholars, presented in collaboration with McCarter Theatre.  Princeton University Concerts is under new Artistic Direction. PUC’s new Manager,  Marna Seltzer, says “Princeton University Concerts has presented the world’s most commanding performers since 1894. Next year’s series builds on that tradition while spotlighting artists new to Princeton audiences and expanding the offerings to reach a more diverse audience.  We hope to welcome more students to our concerts and to engage the community both on and off campus.”

The work of Beethoven is featured on almost every program in the 2011-2012 season.  Scott Burnham, Professor of Music History at Princeton, Beethoven scholar and author of Beethoven Hero, will survey Beethoven’s creative genius in pre-concert talks given before most of the concerts. This rare opportunity—a kind of public seminar—is usually only experienced in the classroom by Princeton students.

Subscriptions are now on sale for the 2011-2012 season.  For the first time, PUC offers several different subscription packages making it easier to subscribe.  Single tickets will go on sale Tuesday, September 6.  For more information, contact the PUC concert office at 609-258-2800.


THE 2011-2012 SEASON
(Organized by series, then chronologically)

CONCERT CLASSICS
The cornerstone of the PUC season, offered as the full subscription of 8 concerts or, for the first time, as a 3-concert series, features the pillars of classical music performed by today’s most renowned artists.  All concerts take place on Thursday nights in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.

*indicates Princeton University Concerts debut

Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
EMERSON STRING QUARTET

Beethoven Quartet for Strings in E-flat Major, Op. 127
Barber Adagio 
Shostakovich Quartet for Strings No. 5 in B-flat Major, Op. 92

“America’s greatest quartet” (Time), named for the 19th Century American philosopher, has captured nine Grammies, three Gramophone Awards and the coveted Avery Fisher Prize, and prompted the Times of London to opine, “with musicians like this there must be some hope for humanity.” Their season-opening concert features works that are among the most moving and provocative that humanity has ever produced. The first of Beethoven’s legendary late string quartets launches our season-long tribute to a composer whose music is still considered radical. Following Barber’s astonishingly moving anthem (as originally written) comes a brilliant quartet by Shostakovich, who knew something of Beethoven’s pain and anguish. With Soviet authorities turning a deaf ear to his genius, he saved his most private utterances for quartets he wasn’t sure would ever be heard in public. On that score, happily, he was wrong.  This event is part of the community-wide festival “Memory and the Work of Art.”  More details on that festival can be found at princeton.edu/memory.

Thursday, November 10, 2011 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

ALISA WEILERSTEIN, Cello*
INON BARNATAN, Piano*

Beethoven Cello Sonata No. 2 in G Minor, Op. 5, No. 2
Barber Cello Sonata in C Minor, Op. 6
Stravinsky Suite Italienne
Chopin Cello Sonata in G Minor, Op. 65 

At age four, Alisa Weilerstein had chicken pox, so her grandmother (in addition, no doubt, to making chicken soup) fashioned a makeshift instrument from cereal boxes to keep her occupied. That soon gave way to a real instrument, and now the 29-year-old cellist breakfasts with champions of music whenever she wishes. Lest you conclude that she’s done nothing but concertize for the last two and a half decades, consider that she holds a degree in Russian history from Columbia. “If Ms. Weilerstein is precocious,” wrote the New York Times, “it is in communicating, as many older musicians do not, a distinctive artistic personality.” Israeli-born Inon Barnatan, her pianist in this concert, was praised by London’s Evening Standard as “a true poet of the keyboard: refined, searching, unfailingly communicative.” The pair will communicate their worldly insights into music spanning two centuries.

Thursday, January 19, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
ENSEMBLE ACJW*

Beethoven Trio for Clarinet, Cello and Piano, Op. 11
David Bruce Gumboots*
Shostakovich Piano Trio No. 2

If their name is less than memorable, the artistry of this young ensemble is unforgettable. Their mission: to be musical ambassadors to the next generation of audience members by giving back to the communities that nurtured them. Their provenance is sterling: ACJW is a program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School and the Weill Music Institute in partnership with the New York City Department of Education. The young musicians will be in residence at Princeton, working with music students. Their program features a work by contemporary composer David Bruce. Gumboots was inspired by the African tradition of Gumboot dancing that originated in the often flooded gold mines of South Africa, where slaves circumvented the ban on speaking to each other by slapping their Wellingtons and chains to communicate. Mr. Bruce calls his piece a “celebration of the rejuvenating power of dance.” At the end of a recent performance, reported the Charleston City Paper, listeners “leaped to their feet, screaming and shouting, like they’d been blown out of aircraft ejection seats.” 

Thursday, February 16, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
JULIA FISCHER, Violin*
MILANA CHERNYAVSKA, Piano*

Beethoven Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96
Ysaye Sonata for Solo Violin No. 1 in G Minor, Op. 27, No. 1
Saint-Saens Sonata No. 1 in D Minor, Op. 75

With a blazing career, huge technique, large discography, Frankfurt professorship and an infant son, Julia Fischer does not often perform in the United States, which makes us especially fortunate to have her. Quite simply, at 27 she ranks among the world’s top violinists. “She may have spitfire technique,” observed the Financial Times, “but the notes are not an end in themselves but purely a means to expressing musical truths.” In addition to a Beethoven sonata, she will take the stage by herself to perform a fiendishly difficult sonata by Ysaye. The program concludes with a sonata by Saint-Saens, which closes with a virtuosic movement that’s sure to knock ones socks off.

Thursday, March 1, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
HAGEN STRING QUARTET*

Beethoven String Quartet in F Minor, Op. 95, “Serioso”
Haydn String Quartet in E-Flat Major, Op. 33, No. 2, “The Joke”
Mozart Quartet in D Major, K. 575

The Hagen Quartet comprises three siblings from Salzburg who have been playing together for more than 30 years, and a “newcomer” who joined them 25 years ago. Such is their renown and standing as the most enduring quartet in Europe that they seldom perform in the United States. A Wigmore Hall engagement was reviewed this way by The Independent: “Their performance was filled with subtlety and wonder… the playing was breathtaking in its precision, dynamism and agility – a thrilling encounter.” For their Princeton appearance, they pair a string quartet that ends rather comically by the “father” of the genre, and a somber one by Beethoven, who months before composing it confided to a friend, “If I had not read somewhere that a man may not voluntarily part with his life as long as a good deed remains for him to perform, I should long ago have been no more – and indeed by my own hand.” The concluding work by Mozart – given that he, too, was plagued by physical ailments and was, as usual, financially strapped when he wrote it – is surprisingly joyful. 

Thursday, March 15, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
JERUSALEM STRING QUARTET

Beethoven Quartet in G-Major, Op. 18, No. 2
Debussy String Quartet
Brahms Quartet in A-minor, Op. 51, No. 2

Four virtuosi still in their 20s – three from the former Soviet Union and one from La Jolla – make up one of the hottest string quartets in the world. A critic from the Vancouver Sun gushed, “Normally it takes years and years to develop such a blend of voices and such a spectrum of colors. They have loads of energy and passion and the control, finesse and sophistication to go with it.” Presumably, Daniel Barenboim agrees; he loaned the favorite cello of his late wife, Jacqueline du Pre, to the quartet’s cellist. Their program includes works by two masters of the genre, along with the only quartet penned by Debussy. In recently ranking this Impressionist among the top ten composers of all time, The New York Times explained, “With his pioneering harmonic language, the sensual beauty of his sound and his uncanny, Freudian instincts for tapping the unconscious, Debussy was the bridge over which music passed into the tumultuous 20th Century.” 

Thursday, April 5, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
JONATHAN BISS, Piano*

Beethoven Sonata in C Minor, Op. 10, No. 1
Janacek “In the Mists”
Beethoven Sonata in C-sharp Minor, Op. 27, No. 2, “Moonlight”
Janacek Sonata 1.x.1905, “From the street”
Beethoven Sonata in E-flat Major, Op. 81a, “Les Adieux”

Jonathan Biss says he must love a piece in order to play it – and he especially enjoys coupling composers to create a dialogue between the two. Terrific intensity characterizes the music of Beethoven and Janacek, he tells us. “Beethoven’s sonatas give you the feeling that from the first note, you’re being inexorably led towards the last. Janacek, by contrast, is perhaps the greatest master of the apparent musical non-sequitur. Their building blocks could not be more different, making the similarities in their temperament all the more fascinating.  “The deep nostalgia in Janacek’s In the Mists, I feel sure, is a longing for a lost musical world, the very world that Beethoven inhabited. But when I play Beethoven after the Janacek Sonata it carries the feeling of consolation to a far greater extent. Beethoven could not have predicted the events that inspired Janacek to compose his Sonata, but his music addresses every aspect of the human experience, and therefore is moving in any context. I become the conduit through which a conversation between two great masters takes place.”   And now you know why Jonathan Biss is considered a musician’s musician.

Thursday, May 3, 2012 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
DAVID DANIELS, Countertenor*
MARTIN KATZ, Piano
MARK MORRIS, Choreographer*
A recital with dance, including songs by Gluck, Handel and Brahms (world premiere)

The season finale marks a first in the 118-year history of Princeton University Concerts – an interdisciplinary presentation uniting music and dance. The greatest choreographer of his generation and perhaps the greatest countertenor of any generation continue a partnership that began with Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice at the Metropolitan Opera. About David Daniels, Mark Morris has said “David Daniels is our greatest countertenor. He has a dynamic range that no one else has: floating pianissimi and enormous power that can fill the biggest halls.” The inspiration for the program was the grief-stricken Orfeo’s aria “Che Faro,” the plaintive beauty of which moves Amor to bring Eurydice back to life.  At Princeton, Mr. Morris, who insists upon live music for all of his Company’s performances, will have one of the most intimate settings ever for his work.


RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS
Formed in 1994-95, this mixed ensemble comprises Princeton’s Performance Faculty, distinguished guest artists, and supremely talented students. A highlight of their three concerts will be Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time, written in 1940 while the composer was in captivity in a stalag in Silesia. “It was dreadfully cold – the stalag was buried under snow,” he later recalled. The 30,000 prisoners, mostly French, were starving. The quartet was given its world premiere before an audience of 5,000 in January 1941 under less than ideal conditions. “The four musicians played on broken instruments. [The] cello had only three strings, and the keys on my upright would stick and not rebound… I had been rigged out with a green jacket in utter tatters and was wearing wooden clogs.” In a triumph of the human spirit, the composer survived, as did his composition. Overcoming the worst degradation human beings can devise to create everlasting beauty? Priceless. Richardson Chamber Players concerts take place on Sunday’s at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium.  Each concert will feature informal commentary from prominent hosts, exploring the themes of each concert.

Sunday, October 16, 2011, at 3:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
“Art & MEMORY”

Ravel from Le Tombeau de Couperin for solo piano
Chausson Chanson perpétuelle for voice, string quartet and piano
Messiaen Quartet for the End of Time
part of the series Memory and the Work of Art, A Princeton Community Collaboration

Players include: JoAnn Sternberg, clarinet; Jennifer Tao, piano; Anna Lim, violin; Dov Scheindlin, viola; Susannah Chapman, cello; and Barbara Rearick, mezzo-soprano

Sunday, March 11, 2012 at 3:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
“LOOKING FORWARD & BACK”

Beethoven Variations “See the conqu’ring hero comes” from Judas Maccabeus
Paul Lansky Ancient Echoes
Stravinsky Octet for winds
Brahms Variations of a Theme by Haydn for Two Pianos, Op. 56b

Players include: JoAnn Sternberg, clarinet; Jayn Rosenfeld, flute; Peggy Kampmeier, piano; Lisa Shihoten, violin; Dov Scheindlin, viola; Tom Kraines, cello; and John Ferrari, percussion

Sunday, May 6, 2012 at 8:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
“CONSTABLE & LANDSCAPE
in collaboration with The Princeton University Art Museum Exhibition: Constable’s Cloud Studies

Debussy Nuages from Preludes for two pianos, arranged by Ravel
Beethoven An die ferne Geliebte for tenor and piano
Britten Phantasy Quartet for Oboe and Strings
Schumann Quintet for Piano and Strings in E-flat Major, Op. 44

Players include: Matthew Sullivan, oboe; Geoff Burleson, piano; Lisa Shihoten, violin; Dov Scheindlin, viola; Tom Kraines, cello; and David Kellett, tenor


BONUS CONCERTS - NEW THIS SEASON

Monday, December 12, 2011 at 8:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
THE TALLIS SCHOLARS
PETER PHILLIPS, Director
presented in collaboration with McCarter Theatre

Nearing their 40th anniversary, the Tallis Scholars are “the rock stars of Renaissance vocal music,” in the words of the New York Times. Director Peter Phillips has created, through good tuning and blend, the purity and clarity that he feels best serve the sacred Renaissance repertoire, so that every detail of the musical lines can be heard. The result: a beauty of sound for which the ensemble is world renowned. Their holiday program is built around various masterful settings of the Magnificat, or Song of Mary, by composers who span the centuries. Among them, Renaissance composers Praetorius and Palestrina, and contemporary composers John Taverner and Arvo Pärt.

Tuesday, March 6, 2012 at 8:00PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
TIME FOR THREE*
presented in collaboration with The Princeton University School of Architecture

Two students at the Curtis Institute with a love for country western and bluegrass teamed with a third who had deep roots in jazz and improvisation, calling their garage band Time for Three. Later, while the Philadelphia Orchestra was giving an outdoor concert in 2003, lightning caused a power failure (or perhaps it should henceforth be known as a power surge). As technicians tried to restore the stage lights, two of the orchestra’s musicians – secretly members of Tf3! – stepped forward to give an impromptu jam session.  The crowd went wild! Thus was born a supergroup that has since given high-wattage performances all over the country. Zach, Nick and Ranaan share a passion for composing, arranging and improv, and their music is a fascinating blend of classical, country western, gypsy and jazz. So a Bach air is likely to give way to a tune from Fiddler on the Roof, which might precede Amazing Grace.  This concert will be presented in collaboration with The Princeton University School of Architecture.  Architecture students will spend the fall semester exploring the nature of a “moveable concert hall” building some sort of temporary installation that will accompany the performances of Tf3.  In days leading up to the performance in Richardson, Tf3 will make informal suprise appearances both on and off campus, a moveable feast complete with its own concert structure.

*indicates Princeton University Concerts debut


SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION

Concert Classics
Full Subscription, all 8 concerts $229, $179, $119
NEW! Next Generation Series, 3 recitals (Weilerstein; Biss; Fischer) $96, $72, $48

Richardson Chamber Players, 3 concerts  $30, 
Add this to a full Concert Classics Subscription and pay only $24

Bonus Concerts
Tallis Scholars, $40, $35, $30
Subscribe to the Concert Classics Series and receive a five-dollar discount off this price.
All single tickets will be sold by McCarter Theatre at higher prices.

Time for Three, FREE for all subscribers.  Limit one ticket per person.

Subscriptions can be bought by calling the Concert Office at 609.258-2800.  Subscription information can be submitted online at princetonuniversityconcerts.org.

For all questions, contact the Concert Office at 609.258.2800.


# # #







Valid from 04/04/2011 to 03/07/2012

 

Princeton University Concerts 2010-2011

09/13/2010

Season at a Glance

 

Thursday, September 23, 2010 at 8:00 p.m.
THE MUIR STRING QUARTET

Thursday, October 14, 2010 at 8:00 p.m.
IVAN MORAVEC, piano

Sunday, November 7, 2010 at 3:00 p.m.
THE RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

Thursday, November 11, 2010 at 8:00 p.m.
THE COLORADO STRING QUARTET

Thursday, January 13, 2011 at 8:00 p.m.
THE AMERICAN STRING QUARTET

Thursday, February 10, 2011 at 8:00 p.m.
NAREK HAKHNAZARYAN, violoncello

Sunday, February 20, 2011 at 3:00 p.m.
THE RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

Thursday, March 10, 2011 at 8:00 p.m.
THE ADASKIN STRING TRIO

Thursday, March 31, 2011 at 8:00 p.m.
THE NASH ENSEMBLE OF LONDON

Sunday, May 1, 2011 at 3:00 p.m.
THE RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 8:00 p.m.
THE TOKYO STRING QUARTET

Valid from 09/13/2010 to 05/20/2011

 

MARCH CHAMBER MUSIC AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS

02/14/2011

ADASKIN STRING TRIO & NASH ENSEMBLE OF LONDON COME TO PRINCETON
 
The next concert on the Princeton University Concerts Classics Series will feature the Adaskin
String Trio.  The ensemble will appear on the series on Thursday, March 10, 2011 at 8pm
in Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall.  The program will feature four cornerstones of the
string trio repertoire, trios by Beethoven, Dohnanyi, Haydn and Martinu.  Martinu once taught
in the Princeton Department of Music.  Following that, The Nash Ensemble of London will be
in residence for 5 days, participating in several concerts, working with students at Princeton and
at Westminster Choir College.  They will give two concerts.  The first will feature the work of two
composition students from the Princeton University Music Department.  That concert will take
place on Tuesday, March 28 at 8pm in Taplin Auditorium at Fine Hall.  The second concert, on
the Princeton University Concerts Classic Series, will take place on Thursday, March 31 at 8pm in
Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall.  The program will feature chamber works by Mozart
and Brahms.  For complete listing details on our March concerts, please refer to the end of this
release.


ABOUT ADASKIN STRING TRIO
Celebrating over 15 years of music making, the Adaskin String Trio commands a vast string
trio repertoire ranging from the Classical era to today’s composers.  The Trio performs
extensively throughout the United States and Canada, and has appeared at Merkin Concert
Hall in New York, the Corcoran Gallery of Art in Washington DC, and in Boston, Los
Angeles, Montreal, Nashville, Pittsburgh, Santa Barbara, and Chicago.   The trio’s recordings
include the complete Beethoven String Trios on Musica Omnia which won critical acclaim in
American Record Guide.

Although the Adaskin String Trio is currently based in New England, the members of the trio are
all originally from Canada. They met in Montreal where they each studied chamber music with
founding Orford Quartet cellist Marcel Saint-Cyr. They later completed two years as ensemble-in-
residence at The Hartt School under the guidance of the Emerson Quartet. The trio is named in
honor of Murray Adaskin, one of Canada ‘s most loved and respected composers, and two of his
brothers, violinist Harry Adaskin and producer and music educator John Adaskin.


THE PROGRAM
BEETHOVEN   String Trio in G Major, Op. 9, No. 1          
MARTINU  String Trio, No. 1
HAYDN   String Trio in A major (Baryton Trio #71)
DOHNANYI  Serenade for String Trio


ABOUT THE NASH ENSEMBLE OF LONDON
The Nash Ensemble of London is one of Britain’s foremost musical ensembles.  For the past forty
years, it has been renowned throughout the world for the calibre of its players, its imaginative
programming, and its dedication to the recognition and promotion of new composers.


Amelia Freedman, the Nash’s founder and artistic director, has received many honors including
Fellow of the Royal Academy of Music and the CBE.  She holds an Honorary Doctorate from Bath
University, the Chevalier of the Order National du Merite for her services to French Music, the
Cobbett Gold Medal of The Worshipful Company of Musicians, and the prestigious Leslie Boosey
Award of the Performing Rights and Royal Philharmonic Societies.  In addition to her work with
The Nash Ensemble, Ms. Freedman has served as Head of Classical Music at the South Bank Centre,
and has been Artistic director of the Bath Mozartfest since 1995.


The Nash Ensemble will be in residence at Princeton for 5 days.  In addition to two public
performances, they will work with graduate students in composition, give masterclasses, work with
students at Westminster Choir College and Princeton High School, appear in several Princeton
classes and meet with students informally in dorms and dining halls.


THE PROGRAMS


March 29, 2011
POULENC  Sonata for Oboe and Piano
TROY HERION Graduate Student in Composition, Work TBD
GILAD COHEN Graduate Student in Composition, Work TBD
RAVEL  Piano Trio in A Major

March 31, 2011
MOZART   Piano Quartet in G  Minor, K. 478
MOZART   Oboe Quartet in F Major, K. 370
BRAHMS   Piano Quintet in F Minor, Op. 34
PERFORMERS
Ian Brown, Piano; Gareth Hulse, Oboe; Marianne Thorsen, Violin; Laura Samuel, Violin; Philip
Dukes, Viola; Paul Watkins, Cello


 

Valid from 02/21/2011 to 04/01/2011

 

MAY AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS

04/12/2011

 

MAY AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS

 

CLOSING THE RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS SEASON

The Richardson Chamber Players closes its season with “Fleur de Lys,” music for king and courtier on Sunday, May 1, 2011 at 3pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. The concert will feature music by French baroque masters Rameau and Monteclair played by Princeton’s performance faculty including baroque violinst Nancy Wilson and harpsichordist Wendy Young.

 

TOKYO QUARTET CLOSES THE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS SEASON

The final concert on the Princeton University Concerts Classics Series will feature the famed Tokyo String Quartet, friend to Princeton audiences since its formation in 1968. The Quartet will appear on the series on Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  The program will feature quartets by Mozart, Takemitsu and Beethoven.

 

For complete listing details on both concerts, please refer to the end of this release.

 

ABOUT THE RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

The Richardson Chamber Players was founded during the 1994-1995 Centennial Season of Princeton University Concerts.  For fifteen seasons, The “RCP” has brought to Princeton audiences programs of unusual interest, largely consisting of works for singular combinations of instruments and voices, which would otherwise remain unheard.  Performers are drawn from the professional musicians who teach instrumental music and voice at Princeton, as well as distinguished guest artists.  Occasionally, the players are joined by exceptional Princeton University Students. The artistic direction of the group rotates.  This season’s programs were conceived by a small committee consisting of violinists Anna Lim and Nancy Wilson, Soprano Martha Elliott and clarinetist Jo-Ann Sternberg.

 

THE PROGRAM

 

“FLEUR DE LYS,” Music for King and Courtier

RAMEAU Cinquieme Concert from Pieces de Clavecin en Concert
MONTECLAIR Cantata Pan et Sirinx
RAMEAU Troisieme Concert from Pieces de Clavecin en Concert
RAMEAU Quatrieme Concert from Pieces de Clavecin en Concert
MONTECLAIR Cantata La Mort de Didon

 

THE PLAYERS

Martha Elliott, Soprano; Colin St. Martin, Flute; Nancy Wilson; Violin;

Vivian Barton Dozor, Viola da Gamba; Wendy Young, Harpsichord

 

ABOUT TOKYO QUARTET

Officially formed in 1969 at the Juilliard School, the Tokyo String Quartet traces its origins to the Toho School of Music in Tokyo, where the founding members were deeply influenced by Professor Hideo Saito. Instilled with a deep commitment to chamber music, the original members of what would become the Tokyo Quartet eventually came to America for further study with Robert Mann, Raphael Hillyer, and Claus Adam. Soon after its formation, the quartet won First Prize at the Coleman Competition, the Munich Competition, and the Young Concert Artists International Auditions.  Since then, the quartet has collaborated with a remarkable array of artists and composers, built a comprehensive catalogue of critically acclaimed recordings, and established a distinguished teaching record.  Today the quartet comprises violist Kazuhide Isomura, a founding member; second violinist Kikuei Ikeda, who joined in 1974; cellist Clive Greensmith, a 1999 arrival; and first violinist Martin Beaver, with the group since the fall of 2002. The Tokyo has served as quartet-in-residence on the faculty of Yale University's School of Music since 1976 and has made over 30 recordings, seven of which have been nominated for Grammy Awards.  The quartet performs on a group of renowned Stradivarius instruments known as "The Paganini Quartet."  For more information on the Tokyo Quartet visit www.tokyoquartet.com.

 

THE PROGRAM

 

MOZART                          Quartet No. 15 in D Minor, K. 421

TAKEMITSU                        String Quartet No. 1 "A way a lone"

BEETHOVEN                        Quartet in B-flat Major, Op. 130

 

 

 

CALENDAR LISTING INFORMATION

 

 

TOKYO STRING QUARTET

 

WHEN:                          Thursday, May 19, 2011 at 8:00PM

 

WHERE:                        Princeton University Concerts, Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

 

TICKETS:                        $40, $30, $20;  students $10, $5

                                    Tickets can be bought over the phone by calling Princeton University

                                    Ticketing at  (609) 258-9220 or online at www.princeton.edu/utickets

 

PICTURES:                        Please contact Princeton University Concerts for pictures of

                                    The Tokyo Quartet or download them directly from their

                                    website at http://www.tokyoquartet.com/artist.php?view=dpk

 

PROGRAM

NOTES:                        Program Notes are available by contacting Princeton University Concerts

                                     at (609) 258-2800

 

QUESTIONS:            Contact Princeton University Concerts at (609) 258-2800

 

 

RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

 

WHEN:                          Sunday, May 1, 2011 at 3:00PM

 

WHERE:                        Princeton University Concerts, Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

 

TICKETS:                        $20, $15, $10; students $5

                                    Tickets can be bought over the phone by calling Princeton University

                                     Ticketing at  (609) 258-9220 or online at www.princeton.edu/utickets

 

PROGRAM

NOTES:                        Program Notes are available by contacting Princeton University Concerts

                                     at (609) 258-2800

 

QUESTIONS:            Contact Princeton University Concerts at (609) 258-2800

Valid from 04/12/2011 to 05/20/2011

 

THE EMERSON STRING QUARTET OPENS PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CONCERTS 2011-2012 SEASON October 6, 2011

09/20/2011

Princeton University Concerts opens its 2011/2012 season with the Emerson String Quartet appearing on the series for the first time in 12 years on Thursday, October 6, 2011 at 8pm in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  The quartet will be offering a program of works by Shostakovich, Barber and Beethoven, music that explores the relationship between Music and Memory, part of a community-wide collaboration entitled “Memory and the Work of Art.”  Professor Scott Burnham will explore why Barber’s Adagio is so often heard a moments of profound commemoration in a pre-concert talk at 7pm, free to ticketholders.

 

PROGRAM

 

BEETHOVEN                        Quartet for Strings, Op. 127

BARBER                        Adagio from String Quartet, Op. 11

SHOSTAKOVICH            Quartet for String No. 5

 

ABOUT THE EMERSON QUARTET

“America’s greatest quartet” (Time Magazine), named for the 19th Century American philosopher, has captured nine Grammies, three Gramophone Awards and the coveted Avery Fisher Prize, and prompted the Times of London to opine, “with musicians like this there must be some hope for humanity.” Their season-opening concert features works that are among the most moving and provocative that humanity has ever produced. The first of Beethoven’s legendary late string quartets launches a season-long tribute to a composer whose music is still considered radical. Following Barber’s astonishingly moving anthem (as originally written) comes a brilliant quartet by Shostakovich, who knew something of Beethoven’s pain and anguish. With Soviet authorities turning a deaf ear to his genius, he saved his most private utterances for quartets he wasn’t sure would ever be heard in public. On that score, happily, he was wrong.

Valid from 09/20/2011 to 10/07/2011

 

Princeton University Concerts Announces 2013-14 Season

04/07/2013

Building on an exceptional 2012-2013 season that has both drawn critical praise and attracted capacity audiences, Princeton University Concerts (“PUC”) is pleased to announce the details of its 2013-2014 season. Once again, PUC will offer a dynamic series of concerts featuring a broad variety of programs and artists.  Highlights of the upcoming season include performances from three of the world’s finest string quartets, a mezzo-soprano superstar, two pianists at very different points in their careers, and mandolin player and MacArthur genius Chris Thile in a special solo recital connecting him to his classical roots with a program featuring music by Bach. 

PUC is also pleased to announce the addition of “Meet The Music,” two concerts for kids ages 6-12 and their families, featuring musicians from The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center with host Bruce Adolphe.   Inspiring and educating, these critically acclaimed programs are sure to encourage a love of classical music in our young listeners and delight audiences of all ages.

From Greece and Denmark to Poland and Uzbekistan, “PUC” has drawn performers from an international pool of the best of today’s classical musicians.  The concerts will be presented in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, regarded as one of the finest spaces to hear classical music in the country.  PUC will present a total of 15 concerts, including 2 special events, as well as its Richardson Chamber Players series. 

The 2013-2014 season opens in October with the Takács String Quartet performing all of the Bartók String Quartets over two evenings.  Bartók’s string quartets have been at the very heart of the Takács Quartet’s repertory since the group was founded in Budapest in 1975, and it was a recording of those very works that put the Quartet’s name on the international map in the late 1990s.  For the final concert of the season in May 2014, PUC is honored to present the brilliant Polish pianist Piotr Anderszewski, one of the most important artists of his generation.  In between, five musicians will make their PUC debuts, including young Uzbeki piano virtuoso Behzod Abduraimov, and the incomparable mezzo-soprano Joyce DiDonato, whose Princeton engagement is her only recital to be given in the United States next season.  PUC’s Director, Marna Seltzer, says “Princeton University Concerts has presented the world’s most commanding performers since 1894. Next year’s series builds on that tradition while broadening our audience by presenting artists like Chris Thile and reaching out to younger audiences with a new set of Family Concerts. We are on a mission to expand our impact in this community and to develop future audiences for classical music.  I think the 2013-14 season reflects the diversity of scope and offerings that will do just that.”

Please click on attached PDF below for detailed info for each event and ticket info

 

 

 

 

 

Valid from 04/07/2013 to 09/15/2013

 

February Events at Princeton University Concerts

01/22/2013

The month of February is a busy one for Princeton University Concerts, featuring four very different events.  Tenor Ian Bostridge and Mezzo-soprano Angelika Kirchschlager will make one of only three duo appearances in the United States on Thursday, February 7 at 8PM singing selections from Hugo Wolf's Spanisches Liederbuch.  On Tuesday, February 12 at 7:30PM, the stage at Richardson will be given over to the East Coast Chamber Orchestra, and dozens of amateur string players who will join them for one piece.  The Richardson Chamber Players will continue their Sunday afternoon series on Sunday, February 17 at 3PM.  Finally, Princeton University will be the site of the biennial American Handel Society conference (covered under a separate release).  PUC will anchor the conference's public events with an appearance by The English Concert, led by Harry Bicket on Thursday, February 21 at 8PM.  All of the concerts will take place in the University's pristine concert venue Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. 


ABOUT IAN BOSTRIDGE, ANGELIKA KIRCHSCHLAGER and JULIUS DRAKE

Thursday, February 7, 2013 at 8PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

Pre-concert Talk by Professor Susan Youens at 7PM, free to ticketholders

 

PROGRAM:

Selections from HUGO WOLF'S Spanisches Liederbuch

Two singers working at the peak of their skills join forces for this lucid, wide-ranging collection of songs from Hugo Wolf's spiritual and secular Spanish Songbook.  Britain's Opera Today said of this duo's performance of Hugo Wolf's treatment of 16th- and 17th-century Spanish poems: Ian Bostridge and Angelika Kirchschlager revealed the profound emotional intensity of Wolf's art; the concentrated ardour of their performance intimated the heightened passion and expressive angst which, as well as driving Wolf's creative spirit, also led to persistent depression and resulted in insanity and finally death in a mental asylum at the age of 42.  Mr. Bostridge ranks Wolf with Schubert and Schumann as the best of the 19th-century's song composers. He and Ms. Kirchschlager will only perform these alluring songs at two other venues Lincoln Center and the Kimmel Center which puts Princeton University at the center of the lieder universe in 2013.

 

This concert will be preceded by a pre-concert talk given by Professor Susan Youens, a professor at Notre Dame and the author of many respected books on German lieder and a noted musicologist who is well known for her work on Franz Schubert and Hugo Wolf.

 

 

ABOUT EAST COAST CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Tuesday, February 12, 2013 at 7:30PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

 

PROGRAM:

MOZART Divertimento in F Major, K. 138

TCHAIKOVSKY Serenade for Strings in C Major GEMINIANI/WIANKO  "La Follia" Variations for String Orchestraplus a community reading of BENJAMIN BRITTEN'S Simple Symphony with ECCO

 

In 2001, a group of musicians -- colleagues and friends from leading conservatories and music festivals across the country collectively -- envisioned the creation of a democratically-run, self-conducted chamber orchestra that would thrive on the pure joy and camaraderie of classical music-making. This organic approach and high level of passion and commitment resulted in ECCO, a dynamic collective that combines the strength and power of a great orchestral ensemble with the personal involvement and sensitivity of superb chamber music. ECCO's debuts in venues such as New York's Town Hall and the Kennedy Center confirmed its position as one of the most exceptional ensembles of today's generation.  So, we ask you to imagine hearing two dozen of the very best young string players in the country play music they love with all the passion and fire at their command. Now imagine that, as a bonus, they ask you to play with them! It would be like winning the lottery, minus the taxes. That's precisely what ECCO is, and what they'll do in Princeton. Their concert will include a delightful Divertimento by Mozart and Tchaikovsky's lush Serenade for Strings. In between those two works, every string player with an instrument in tow will be invited to perform with ECCO! Even if you're not concertizing yourself, the experience is guaranteed to reverberate for a very long time. 

Reservations are required for the community reading and the deadline is February 1, 2013.  For more information, please call the Concert Office at 609-258-2800.

 

ABOUT RICHARDSON CHAMBER PLAYERS

Sunday, February 17, 2013 at 3PM in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall

 

PROGRAM BACHIANAS AND MORE

VILLA-LOBOS Bachianas Brasileiras No. 6 for Flute and Bassoon

KURT WEILL Frauentanz, 7 Poems from the Middle Ages, Op. 10 for Soprano and Instruments HINDEMITH Die junge Magd, Song cycle for Mezzo-soprano, Flute, Clarinet, and String QuartetVILLA-LOBOS Bachianas Brasileiras No. 5 for Soprano and an Orchestra of Cellos

 

PLAYERS:

Jayn Rosenfeld, flute; Jeff Hodes '12, clarinet; Bob Wagner, bassoon; Chris Komer, horn; Ruotao Mao, violin; Dean Wang '13, violin; Danielle Farina, viola; Alberto Parrini, cello; Martha Elliott, soprano; Barbara Rearick, mezzo-soprano; Michael Pratt, conductor; cellists of the Princeton University Orchestra

The Richardson Chamber Players, Princeton's resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students continues its season with a concert titled Bachianas & More.  The program features two of the series of nine Bachianas Brasilieras suites by the Brazilian composer Heitor Villa-Lobos, written for various combinations of instruments and voices between 1930 and 1945. They represent a fusion between Brazilian folk and popular music on one hand, and the style of Johann Sebastian Bach on the other, as an attempt freely to adapt a number of Baroque harmonic and contrapuntal procedures to Brazilian music.  Number 5, Villa-Lobos best known work, features an orchestra of eight cellists and soprano.

 

ABOUT THE ENGLISH CONCERT

HARRY BICKET, Director/Harpsichord

Nadja Zwiener,  Violin

Alfonso Leal del Ojo, Viola

Thursday, February 21, 2013 at 8PM

Pre-concert Talk by Professor Steven Zohn at 7PM, free to ticketholders

PROGRAM:
PURCELL Suite from King Arthur, Z 628.

HANDEL Concerto Grosso Op. 3 No. 2 in B-flat Major, HWV 313 TELEMANN Concerto for Viola in G Major, TWV 51:G9BACH Concerto for Violin No. 1 in A Minor, BWV 1041

HANDEL Watermusic Suite (selections from Suites No 1, 2 and 3)

ABOUT THE ENGLISH CONCERT

The English Concert was founded by Trevor Pinnock in 1973. The orchestra chose Harry Bicket to be its Artistic Director in 2007, and he has since led the orchestra in tours to Europe, the USA and the Middle East. Bicket is renowned internationally for his work in opera with the finest singers of the age.  When the Father of our country was born in 1732, Henry Purcell, alas, was long dead but Georg Philipp Telemann was writing music in Hamburg, and George Frideric Handel was composing in London. The music of these three composers will be performed. The ensemble is acclaimed for its Handel interpretations, and its appearance on our series anchors the American Handel Festival in Princeton in 2013 (covered in a separate release). More information on the American Handel Festival and Conference can be found online at music2.princeton.edu/AHS

 

This concert will be preceded by a pre-concert talk given by Professor Steven Zohn, the Laura H. Carnell Professor of Music History at Temple University. His research on eighteenth-century music has been published widely in journals, essay collections, and reference works.

 

All concerts take place in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  Ticket prices range from $5-$40 and can be bought by calling 609-258-9220 or visiting Princeton.edu/utickets.  For other information, please contact the Concert Office at 609-258-2800.

For a listing of our upcoming concerts, visit our website at princetonuniversityconcerts.org

 
Visit us at facebook.com/princetonuniversityconcerts

Valid from 01/22/2013 to 02/22/2013

 

Princeton University Concerts Single Tickets Now On Sale

08/05/2015

Single tickets to all Princeton University Concerts (“PUC”) are now on sale, including tickets to the all-new PUC125 series.  Tickets are on sale exclusively online at princetonuniversityconcerts.org.   Patrons will be able to buy tickets by phone and in person as of Tuesday, September 8, 2015. 

 

Once again, the PUC audience can expect the season to be jam-packed with the most exciting and recognized of today’s performing artists. In addition to highly-anticipated performances by both new and returning revered soloists and established string quartets, celebrated independent artists—including violin superstar Christian Tetzlaff, Emmanuel Pahud, declared by The Guardian to be “the nearest thing we’ve had to a star flautist since James Galway,” and Tabea Zimmermann, regularly cited as the world’s greatest living violist—will make rare ensemble appearances.

Several new initiatives highlight PUC’s commitment to deepening the fully immersive aspect of chamber music. As well as introducing “Baby Got Bach,” a family concert geared toward children ages 3-6, PUC will also bring performances “up close.” Renowned violinist Isabelle Faust will perform in the round at the Princeton University Chapel, which will be specially lit to complement the luminous cycle of Bach’s complete violin sonatas and partitas.  In the new series PUC125, concertgoers will be able to experience music more directly than ever before sitting on the Richardson stage of Alexander Hall alongside the performers, and more conveniently than ever before with each one-hour concert at both 6PM and 9PM. An unquestionably vibrant new generation of musicians, including virtuoso accordion player Julien Labro, and the Princeton-favorite Ébène String Quartet, will present music ranging from Renaissance to prepared piano to jazz. These concerts are the epitome of music without bounds. Events on the PUC125 series are only offered as single tickets at an unusually low price, just $25 for adults and $10 for students.

The 2015-2016 PUC season will consist of a total of 21 concerts, including two special events, six pairs of PUC125 events, and the Richardson Chamber Players series. Concertgoers are urged to buy their tickets early to ensure availability. On the heels of an unparalleled 2014-2015 season, the upcoming series promises to continue pushing the frontiers of the classical concert experience. For a complete listing of concerts visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org.

SINGLE TICKET PRICES

Concert Classics Series Concerts – 8 Thursday Nights

Emerson String Quartet; Pavel Haas String Quartet; Arcanto String Quartet; Emmanuel Pahud, flute & Christian Rivet, guitar; Igor Levit, piano; Tetzlaff Trio; Paul Lewis, piano; Matthias Goerne, baritone.
$50, $40, $25 general / $10 student

PUC125 Series – 6 pairs of one-hour concerts presented in the round on the Richardson stage of Alexander Hall

Gallicantus Renaissance Vocal Ensemble; Calidore String Quartet; David Greilsammer, piano/prepared piano; Ébène String Quartet; Escher String Quartet; Julien Labro, accordion/bandoneon/accordina.  
$25 general / $10 student

Special Events
Isabelle Faust, violin - $40 general / $10 students; add this event to a Concert Classics subscription and receive a 20% discount off single ticket prices.

Alexander Melnikov, piano - $50, $40, $25 general / $10 students; add this event to a Concert Classics subscription and receive a 20% discount off single ticket prices.

Family Concerts – 2 Concerts
$10 adults / $5 kids, buy both and save 20% off single ticket prices

Richardson Chamber Players 3 Sunday afternoon concerts featuring Princeton’s resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students  
$15 general / $5 student

HOW TO BUY SINGLE TICKETS:

ONLINE
princetonuniversityconcerts.org

BY PHONE, as of Tuesday, September 8, 2015
609-258-9220

IN PERSON
Frist Campus Center Ticket Office (open Monday-Saturday, 11am-5pm)

SUBSCRIPTION PRICES (the best deal):?

Concert Classics Series - 8 Thursday night concerts, save up to 30%
$275, $225, $125

Make Your Own Series
Choose 3 or more different concerts from all of our offerings, except PUC125, and save 10% off single ticket prices.

Richardson Chamber Players – 3 Sunday Afternoon Concerts
All subscriptions just $39 or add these concerts to a Classics series for just $24

HOW TO BUY SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS:

All subscriptions must be bought through the Concert Office. To subscribe, call 609-258-2800 [Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm] or visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org

For further information please contact Darya Koltunyuk at 609-258-6024 or dkoltuny@princeton.edu

Valid from 08/05/2015 to 12/31/2015

 

Princeton University Concerts Presents The Elias String Quartet on April 4 & Pianist Rafal Blechacz on April 25

03/07/2013

The acclaimed Elias String Quartet will make its Princeton University Concerts debut at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall on Thursday evening, April 4 at 8:00PM.  The ensemble was heard for the first time in North America just last year, when they performed with pianist Jonathan Biss at Carnegie Hall and other venues.  Following a concert at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C., critic Charles Downey ofThe Washington Post wrote:   "their willingness to push the dramatic edge of the work transformed the performance into something extraordinary."  Their Princeton program features Leoš Janácek’s second string quartet entitled “Intimate Letters,” written for his much younger lover Kamila Stösslová, whose image Janácek described as “translucent as mist.”  String quartets by Schumann and Haydn, the father of the form, make up the balance of the program.  A musical preview featuring Princeton University students will take place at 7:00 PM and is free to ticket holders. The complete program follows:

 

HAYDN                     Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 64, No. 6 
JÅNACEK                 Quartet No. 2 (“Intimate Letters”)
SCHUMANN             Quartet in A Minor, Op. 41, No. 1

 

Also making his Princeton University Concerts debut, Polish pianist Rafal Blechacz presents a program of works by Bach, Beethoven, Chopin and Szymanowski on Thursday evening, April 25 at 8:00PM at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  The uncontested winner of the 15th Chopin International Piano Competition in Warsaw in 2005, he took home special prizes for the best performances of mazurka, polonaise, concerto and sonata as well. That led to an exclusive recording contract with Deutsche Grammophon, which in turn led to “Best of the Year” honors from Gramophone Magazine for Mr. Blechacz’s recording of the Chopin Piano Concertos. With those bona fides, this rising young artist is ideally suited to perform the varied works on this program.  A pre-concert talk by Ruth Ochs begins at 7:00PM and is free to ticket holders.  The complete program follows: 

 
BACH                          Partita No. 3 in A Minor, BWV 827?
BEETHOVEN             Sonata in D Major, Op. 10, No. 3?
CHOPIN                     Two Polonaises, Op. 40 and Scherzo No. 3 in C-sharp Minor, Op. 39?
SZYMANOWSKI       Sonata No. 1 in C Minor, Op. 8

 

Tickets for both concerts are $20 - $40 ($5 & $10 for students) and are available by calling 609-258-9220 or online at www.princeton.edu/utickets.  They may also be purchased in person at the Frist Campus Ticket Office which is open Monday – Friday from noon to 6:00PM or at the Richardson Auditorium Ticket Office two hours prior to the concert.


Valid from 03/07/2013 to 04/26/2013

 

Princeton University Concerts Announces 2016-2017 Season

08/23/2016

Never before in its 123-year history has Princeton University Concerts (PUC) had so much in store in a single season. In addition to twenty-three concerts across three series, PUC also announces a Performers as Teachers series, a Mindfulness with Music series, and the expansion of the groundbreaking PUC125: Performances Up Close series. 

Performers as Teachers

In addition to their performances, several of the season’s artists will offer the community the incredible opportunity of going behind-the-scenes when they coach talented Princeton students in classes free and open to the public. These are chances to delve into the core of the professionals’ understanding of music and witness the process of a musician’s preparation and development. The classes promise to offer everyone, regardless of any proficiency with the instrument, a unique, deep engagement with music from the other side of the curtain.

  • October 7, 2016: Class with mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton
  • October 28, 2016: Class on piano ensemble music with pianists Sergei Babayan and Daniil Trifonov
  • March 2, 2017: Clais with Rainer Schmidt, violinist of the Hagen String Quartet
  • April 3, 2017: Lecture and class on physical therapy and musicians with violinist Pamela Frank

and her husband Howard Nelson, a New York City based physical therapist who specializes in analyzing how movements and alignments while playing an instrument can cause pain. 

Please visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org for confirmed times and locations.

Mindfulness with Music

After its popular launch last season, Mindfulness with Music returns, in collaboration with Princeton University Office of Religious Life. Twice in the season—in the fall with the Takács String Quartet and in the spring with violinist Pekka Kuusisto—the community is invited to a free Live Music Meditation and Lunch. Guided by Matt Weiner, Associate Dean of the Office of Religious Life, listeners will experience world-class music more viscerally than ever before during a half-hour meditation. Taken outside of the constraints of concert hall etiquette, one’s relationship with the music is simplified to its most personal and sincere.

  • November 16, 2016 12PM: Live Music Meditation with the Takács String Quartet
  • May 1, 2017 12PM: Live Music Meditation with violinist Pekka Kuusisto

Stay tuned for further details at princetonuniversityconcerts.org

PUC125: Performances Up Close

At the heart of PUC125’s mission is to push the concert format to the epitome of music without bounds. Beyond bringing the audience onstage in hour-long interactive programs at diverse times, the series looks to make every aspect of the concert as unrepeatable as the music itself. To this end, this season PUC125 will expand its scope. At each of the four concerts, the Richardson stage will be transformed, tailored to each individual program in collaboration with the musicians and visiting artists from other fields. These include New York City based lighting designer Kate Ashton, and Adobe Creative Resident and Projection Artist Craig Winslow. The curated multimedia environment promises to heighten and extend the listener’s experience of the music in this fusion of art forms. Single tickets for these concerts will be available two months before each concert. At this time, tickets to hear violinist Augustin Hadelich and guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas’ “Histoire du Tango” program on September 29, 2016 are now on sale online, and will go on sale everywhere else on September 6, 2016.

  • September 29, 2016 6PM & 9PM: Augustin Hadelich, violin & Pablo Sáinz Villegas, guitar present “Histoire du Tango” – works by Astor Piazzolla, Manuel De Falla, Eugène Ysaÿe
  • February 14, 2017 6PM & 9PM: Colin Currie, percussion presents “Percussion Alive”solo percussion music by Per Norgaard, Toshio Hosokawa, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Iannis Xenakis
  • March 30, 2017 6PM: Benjamin Bagby, voice & Anglo-Saxon harp presents

“Beowulf” – the epic book in performance

  • April 30, 2017 5PM & 7:30PM: Pekka Kuusisto, violin & Nico Muhly, piano present

“Breaking Ground” – music by J.S. Bach, Philip Glass, Arvo Pärt, Nico Muhly, with Finnish folksongs

 

These special offerings are a part of a season already full of more concerts than ever before. Anchored by the complete cycle of Beethoven’s sixteen string quartets, performed by the Takács String Quartet in a series of six concerts, the season is poised to celebrate the bright spectrum of classical music. In the Concert Classics Series, 25-year-old piano star Daniil Trifonov’s Princeton debut alongside his teacher Sergei Babayan in October will give way in the spring to the return of legendary pianist Murray Perahia. Metropolitan Opera favorite mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton, “opera’s nose-studded rock star” (The New York Times) will offer an intimate debut recital in Richardson Auditorium before the 25-voice Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir fills the Princeton University Chapel a few months later. A return of last season’s favorites includes violinist Christian Tetzlaff, joining his long-time friend Pamela Frank in a rare recital of violin duos, family concerts for youngsters 3-6 (“Baby Got Bach”) and kids 6-12 (“Meet the Music”), as well as the cutting-edge PUC125: Performances Up Close  Series with audience seated onstage around the performers in casual, hour-long concerts.

The 2016-2017 PUC season will consist of a total of 23 concerts, including a special event with banjo legend Béla Fleck with his wife and fellow banjoist Abigail Washburn, four PUC125 programs, six concerts comprising the Beethoven String Quartet cycle, and the Richardson Chamber Players series. The Beethoven String Quartet cycle will be hosted with pre- and post-concert lectures by Princeton Emeritus Professor Scott Burnham; supplemented by a course in partnership with the Princeton Adult School co-taught by Professor Burnham and Edward Dusinberre, first violinist of the Takács Quartet; and the annual Late Night Chamber Jam will allow the amateur string players to jam alongside the Takács members on the Richardson stage. Each concert on the Concert Classics Series will feature a preview event at 7PM—whether a talk by a distinguished music scholar or a performance by talented students. For a complete listing of these events, please see the Season Overview below.

Events are selling out quickly. Concertgoers are urged to buy their tickets early to ensure availability. Committed to a long-standing dedication to making the world’s best chamber music accessible to all, PUC offers tickets as low as $10 to its concerts. In the words of one loyal patron—“the lowest ticket prices in town for the greatest talent in the world.” Most performances are presented in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, renowned for its exceptional acoustics and considered one of the best venues for classical music in the country. With so much in store, the upcoming series promises to be unparalleled. For a complete listing of events visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org.

Single tickets to all concerts in the 2016-17 Princeton University Concerts (“PUC”) Concert Classics Series, Beethoven String Quartet Cycle, All-in-the-Family Series, and Richardson Chamber Players are now on sale, online only, at princetonuniversityconcerts.org. Patrons are now also able to buy single tickets to the Béla Fleck/Abigail Washburn Special Event, as well as the first of the PUC125: Performances Up Close concerts.  These tickets will be available by phone at 609-258-9220 and in person at the Frist Campus Center Box Office as of Tuesday, September 6, 2016. 

 

AN OVERVIEW OF THE 2016-17 SEASON (organized chronologically)?

All concerts take place in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, unless otherwise noted.

* indicates Princeton University Concerts debut.

Thursday, September 29, 2016  6PM & 9PM (PUC125: audience seated onstage)

Augustin Hadelich,* violin • Pablo Sáinz Villegas,* guitar
“Histoire du Tango” –Works by Manuel de Falla, a world premiere by Lorenzo Palomo, Eugène Ysaÿe, Roland Dyens, Astor Piazzolla and Django Reinhardt – The Grammy-winning violin phenomenon and award-winning Spanish guitarist bring highlights from their popular album, Histoire du Tango, conjuring a dark and sultry night of fiery, hot-blooded dancing.  New York City-based lighting designer Kate Ashton will create an atmosphere that reinforces the character and emotional message of each work.

Thursday, October 6, 2016  8PM

Pre-concert talk at 7PM by Professor Lindsay Christiansen from Westmintser Choir College, free to ticketholders

Class with Barton and Princeton students on the morning of Friday, October 7. Further details TBA.

Jamie Barton,* mezzo-soprano • James Baillieu,* piano

Works by Joaquin Turina, Johannes Brahms, Antonin Dvo?ák, Jean Sibelius and Charles Ives – “Hopefully, there won’t be a season she won’t sing at the Met” said Metropolitan Opera’s Peter Gelb. The season opens with a chance to hear the recent Richard Tucker Award-winner in the intimacy of Richardson as she takes the world’s greatest opera houses by storm. 

 

Thursday, October 13, 2016  8PM

Musical Preview at 7PM by alums of the Royal College of Music/Princeton University Exchange program, free to ticketholders

Belcea String Quartet*

Works by Franz Schubert and Johannes Brahms – On a rare tour of the United States, one of the reigning European String Quartets finally makes its long awaited Princeton University Concerts debut.

 

Sunday, October 16, 2016  3PM 

Richardson Chamber Players

“Melting Pot” – An eclectic program of chamber works by Charles Ives, William Bolcom, and Paquito D’Rivera., alongside select American folk songs and modern ballads for brass quintet

 

Thursday, October 27, 2016  8PM
Pre-concert talk at 7PM by Ruth Ochs, free to ticketholders.

Class with Trifonov, Babayan and Princeton students on the morning of Friday, October 28.  Further details TBA.

Daniil Trifonov,* piano • Sergei Babayan,* piano

Works by Robert Schumann, Franz Schubert, Johannes Brahms and Sergei Rachmaninoff – Witness the cherished passing of music from one generation to the next as 25-year-old piano superstar Daniil Trifonov joins his teacher to offer the first two-piano program on the series since 1982.

 

Saturday, November 5, 2016  1PM

All In The Family: “Baby Got Bach” A Family Concert for Kids Ages 3-6

A Concert for Kids Ages 3-6 – Back by popular demand, pianist Orli Shaham will introduce pre-school-aged kids to the joy of live classical music played by renowned musicians.

 

Tuesday, November 15, 2016 8PM • “Beethoven Up Close” seating • Post-concert Talk Back hosted by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham

Thursday, November 17, 2016  8PM • Pre-concert talk at 7PM by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham

Takács String Quartet

Beethoven String Quartets: Concerts 1 & 2 – It is a privilege to host the Takács as they present, for the last time, the complete Beethoven string quartet cycle over six appearances, in three pairs.  The first concert (Op. 18. No. 2; Op. 95 & Op. 130) will feature the Quartet seated directly in the center of the hall and audience surrounding them on all sides, (“Beethoven Up Close” seating).  The second concert (Op. 18, No. 1; Op. 74; and Op. 131) culminates with the tremendous, seven-movement Op. 131.

 

Wednesday, November 16, 2016 12PM

Live Music Meditation with the Takács String Quartet

As part of the Mindfulness with Music series, join Associate Dean of Religious Life, Matt Weiner, in a free guided meditation to live music performed by the Takács String Quartet. Further details TBA.

 

Wednesday, January 18, 2017  8PM • “Beethoven Up Close” seating • Post-concert Talk Back hosted by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham

Thursday, January 19, 2017  8PM •  Pre-concert talk by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham, free to ticketholders

Takács String Quartet

Beethoven String Quartets: Concerts 3 & 4 – Over the course of two consecutive days, the Takács present six quartets spanning Beethoven’s early, middle, and late periods. The first concert features Op. 18, No. 5; Op. 18, No. 4; and Op 132.  The second features Op. 18, No. 3; Op. 59, No. 2; and Op. 127.  Following the concert on January 19, amateur string players will be invited to the stage to jam with the Quartet members in the annual Late Night Chamber Jam.

 

Thursday, February 9, 2017  8PM

Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir* •  Kaspars Putnins, Artistic Director

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CHAPEL

“Northern Land & Spirit,” Choral works by Arvo Pärt, Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Veljo Tormis and Jean Sibelius – In their first visit to the Northeast since selling out Carnegie Hall in 2014, the 25-voice Grammy-nominated ensemble will fill the resounding University Chapel with favorites from Northern Europe.

 

Tuesday, February 14, 2017  6PM & 9PM (PUC125: audience seated onstage)

Colin Currie*, percussion: “Percussion Alive!” – One of the most internationally sought-after solo percussionists of our time will show music at its most primal, liberating and unexpected as he performs feats of percussion acrobatics. His collaborator for this multimedia event will be projection artist Craig Winslow.  Winslow is currently an Adobe Creative Resident – a program that gives talented, emerging creative professionals the opportunity to spend a full year working on their dream projects.  In this collaboration live projections will bring Currie’s instruments to life in unimaginable ways.

Sunday, February 19, 2017  3PM

Richardson Chamber Players

“England’s Green” – A salute to British composers including Ralph Vaughan Williams, Gustav Holst, Gerald Finzi, John McCabe, Benjamin Britten and Edward Elgar.

 

Thursday, March 2, 2017  8PM

Musical Preview at 7PM by Princeton University juniors Sarah and Solene LeVan, free to ticketholders

Class with a member of the Hagen Quartet coaching Princeton students on the morning of March 2. Further Details TBA.

Hagen String Quartet

Works by Franz Schubert, Dmitri Shostakovich and Antonin Dvo?ák – Heralded by Vienna’s Die Presse as “the highest art of existence” and incontestably ruling the European chamber music scene for three decades, the Hagen’s return to Princeton has been eagerly anticipated for the past five years.

 

Saturday, March 11, 2017  1PM

Meet the Music: A Family Concert for Kids Ages 6-12

“Albert & Wolfgang” – The musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and host Bruce Adolphe return on Pi Day Weekend with a program that honors Princeton’s own Albert Einstein. 

 

Wednesday, March 15, 2017  8PM • “Beethoven Up Close” seating • Post-concert Talk Back hosted by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham

Thursday, March 16, 2017  8PM • Pre-concert talk by Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham, free to ticketholders

Takács String Quartet

Beethoven String Quartets: Concerts 5 & 6 – In the first concert (Op. 18, No. 6; Op. 135; Op. 59, No. 3) of this final pair of the Cycle’s concerts, the Takács present the last quartet Beethoven wrote a mere five months before his death. The Beethoven Series closes with three celebrated works from the master’s middle and late periods (Op. 59, No. 1; Op. 130; Op. 133). After this season, the Takács Quartet will no longer perform the Beethoven quartet cycle in its entirety; this performance marks a final bow for the legendary interpreters.

 

Thursday, March 30, 2017  6PM (PUC125: audience seated onstage)

Benjamin Bagby,* voice/Anglo-Saxon harp

“Beowulf: the epic book in performance” – Accompanied by a six-string lyre, the legendary adventures of Beowulf will be recited, chanted, and sung in the original Old English in a production critically-acclaimed for almost two decades. Projection artist Craig Winslow returns to Princeton to collaborate with Bagby on setting the ambience for this monumental tale.

 

Sunday, April 9, 2017  3PM

Richardson Chamber Players

“Looking Forward, Looking Back” – From the Renaissance to the Modern Day, works by American composer Augusta Reade Thomas, Marco Uccellini, Antonio Vivaldi, Arvo Pärt and the premiere of a work by Princeton Composer/Faculty Juri Seo

 

Thursday, April 13, 2017  7:30PM

Béla Fleck,* banjo • Abigail Washburn,* banjo/voice

Music of Appalachia – Béla Fleck is one of the most innovative and influential banjo players of all time, having been nominated for a Grammy in more musical categories than any other artist in history. The collaboration with the soulful singing and claw-hammer style of his wife and fellow banjoist, Abigail Washburn, is one of the most magical in his catalogue. In a season anchored by timeworn masterworks, Fleck and Washburn offer a chamber taste of the newer roots of Appalachia’s great vernacular music in this special event.

 

Thursday, April 20, 2017  8PM

Pamela Frank,* violin • Christian Tetzlaff, violin

Musical Preview  at 7PM by Princeton Girlchoir, free to ticketholders

Lecture and workshop with Frank and her husband Howard Nelson on April 3. Further details TBA.

Violin duos by Jean-Marie Leclair, Sergei Prokofiev, Béla Bartók and Johann Sebastian Bach – Two of the most revered violinists of our time come together for a special evening of rarely performed works for two violins.

 

Sunday, April 30, 2017  5PM & 7:30PM (PUC125: audience seated onstage)

Pekka Kuusisto,* violin • Nico Muhly,* piano

“Breaking Ground” – In the last PUC125 program of the season, the Finnish virtuoso with “the most personal sound of any classical violinist now alive” (The Telegraph) joins the youngest composer ever commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera for a hallmark program combining the music of J.S. Bach with contemporary fare. 

 

Monday, May 1, 2017 12PM

Live Music Meditation with Pekka Kuusisto, violin

As part of the Mindfulness with Music series, join Associate Dean of Religious Life, Matt Weiner, in a free, guided meditation to live music performed on electric violin by Pekka Kuusisto. Further details TBA.

 

Thursday, May 11, 2017  8PM

Pre-concert reading at 7PM by winners of 2016-17 Creative Reactions Contest

Murray Perahia, piano  PADEREWSKI MEMORIAL CONCERT

Having first graced PUC’s stage at the very start of his career, forty years later Perahia returns to Princeton as one of the most influential pianists in history. It is an honor to have him close the season with one of his trademark unrepeatable evenings.

 

TICKET INFORMATION

 

SINGLE TICKET PRICES

Concert Classics Series Concerts – 9 Thursday Nights
Jamie Barton, mezzo-soprano; Belcea String Quartet; Sergei Babayan, piano & Daniil Trifonov, piano; Takács String Quartet (2 concerts); Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir; Hagen String Quartet; Pamela Frank, violin & Christian Tetzlaff, violin; Murray Perahia, piano.
$50, $40, $25 general / $10 students with valid ID

PUC125 Series – 4 pairs of one-hour concerts presented in the round on the Richardson stage of Alexander Hall
Augustin Hadelich, violin & Pablo Sáinz Villegas guitar; Colin Currie, percussion; Benjamin Bagby, voice/Anglo-Saxon harp; Pekka Kuusisto, violin & Nico Muhly, piano.
$25 general / $10 students with valid ID

Beethoven Up Close Series – performed by Takács Quartet, hosted by Princeton Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham

While two of the concerts in the Beethoven Complete String Quartet Cycle are part of the Concert Classics Series, the remaining four are presented in an intimate in-the-round setup.
$40 general / $10 students with valid ID

Special Event
Béla Fleck, banjo & Abigail Washburn, banjo/voice
$40 general / $15 students with valid ID

Family Concerts – 2 Concerts
$10 adults / $5 kids, buy both and save 10% off single ticket prices

Richardson Chamber Players 3 Sunday afternoon concerts featuring Princeton’s resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students 
$15 general / $5 students with valid ID

 

 

 

HOW TO BUY SINGLE TICKETS:

ONLINE
princetonuniversityconcerts.org

BY PHONE, as of Tuesday, September 6, 2016
609-258-9220

IN PERSON
Frist Campus Center Box Office (open Monday-Saturday, 11am-5pm), after September 6, 2016

SUBSCRIPTION PRICES (the best deal):?

Concert Classics Series - 9 Thursday night concerts, save up to 30%
$310, $255, $140

Make Your Own Series
Choose 3 or more different concerts from all of our offerings, except PUC125, and save 10% off single ticket prices.

Richardson Chamber Players – 3 Sunday Afternoon Concerts
All subscriptions just $39 or add these concerts to a Concert Classics series for just $24

HOW TO BUY SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS:

All subscriptions must be bought through the Concert Office. To subscribe, call 609-258-2800 [Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm] or visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org

For further information please contact Dasha Koltunyuk at 609-258-6024 or dkoltuny@princeton.edu

 

Valid from 08/23/2016 to 05/15/2017

 

Princeton University Concerts Opens 2012-2013 Season with the Takács String Quartet October 4, 2012

09/05/2012

Princeton University Concerts opens its 2012-2013 season on Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 8PM with the Takács String Quartet, recognized by many as the finest string quartet in the world today.  The concert will take place in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall with works by Schubert, Britten and Dvorák. Professor Scott Burnham will bring the program to life in a pre-concert talk at 7PM, free to ticket holders.

PROGRAM
SCHUBERT String Quartet No. 13 in A Minor, D. 804 (“Rosamunde”)
BRITTEN String Quartet No. 2 in C Major
DVORÁK String Quartet No. 12 in F Major, Op. 96 (“American”)

The Takács has entered the pantheon of the world’s great string quartets, as evidenced by their hugely engaging performances and unique blend of drama, warmth and humor, as well as their recent appointment as Associate Artists of London’s prestigious Wigmore Hall. Takács “established itself as one of the world’s eminent string ensembles soon after its founding in 1975,” according to The New York Times, which termed their recent Carnegie Hall performance “utterly gripping.” Their program begins with one of Schubert’s last quartets and, marking the centenary of his birth, one by Britten, who in 1945 called it “the greatest advance that I have yet made.” The evening concludes with Dvorák’s “American” Quartet, which, during a visit to the Czech community in Spillville, Iowa, spilled out of the composer in a matter of days.

JUST ADDED

Princeton University Concerts is pleased to announce an addition to its schedule.  The Tokyo String Quartet will appear on the series on Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 7:30PM.  This FREE concert, a gift to the Princeton community, will mark one of the Tokyo Quartet’s final performances before its extraordinary 44-year history comes to an end in June 2013.  Princeton’s love affair with the quartet spans four decades and dozens of appearances.  They leave behind an amazing legacy, including close to 20 CD’s recorded in Princeton’s own Richardson Auditorium.  PUC is proud of its association with this exceptional ensemble and invites the public to join them in bidding the quartet a musical farewell.  Admission is free but reservations are required.  Call University ticketing at 609-258-9220.

Both Subscriptions and Single Tickets are now on sale for the 2012-2013 season.  PUC offers several different subscription packages making it easier to subscribe. For more information, contact the PUC concert office at 609-258-2800. 
 

LISTING INFORMATION

TAKÁCS STRING QUARTET    

WHEN:    Thursday, October 4, 2012 at 8:00PM;  Pre-Concert talk by Scott Burnham at 7:00PM
WHERE:  Princeton University Concerts, Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
TICKETS:  $40, $30, $20  General;  $10, $5 Students

By Phone:  609-258-9220
Online:  princeton.edu/utickets
In Person:  Frist Campus Center Ticket Office (open Monday-Friday, 12-6pm), Richardson Auditorium Ticket Office (open two hours prior to the performances at Richardson Auditorium)

PICTURES: Please contact Princeton University Concerts for pictures of the Takács Quartet or download them directly from the artist’s website athttp://www.takacsquartet.com
PROGRAM  NOTES:  Program Notes are available by contacting Princeton University Concerts at (609) 258-2800

 
TOKYO STRING QUARTET

WHEN:  Wednesday, May 1, 2013 at 7:30PM
WHERE: Princeton University Concerts,  Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall
TICKETS: Free but reservations required.  Call 609-258-9220 for tickets.
PICTURES:  Please contact Princeton University Concerts for pictures of the Tokyo Quartet or download them directly from the artist’s website athttp://www.tokyoquartet.com
PROGRAM NOTES:  Program Notes are available by contacting Princeton University Concerts at (609) 258-2800

 
For all questions, contact the Concert Office at (609) 258-2800.
 

Valid from 09/05/2012 to 11/05/2012

 

Single Tickets to All Concerts in the 2016-17 Princeton University Concerts Series on Sale Now

08/01/2016

Single tickets to all concerts in the 2016-17 Princeton University Concerts ("PUC") Concert Classics Series, Beethoven String Quartet Cycle, All-in-the-Family Series, and Richardson Chamber Players are now on sale, online only, at princetonuniversityconcerts.org. Patrons are now also able to buy single tickets to the Béla Fleck/Abigail Washburn Special Event, as well as the first of the PUC125: Performances Up Close concertsThese tickets will be available by phone and in person as of Tuesday, September 6, 2016. 

 

PUC is offering a more abundant selection of concerts than ever before in its 123-year history. Anchored by the complete cycle of Beethoven's sixteen string quartets, performed by the Takács Quartet in a series of six concerts, the season is poised to celebrate the bright spectrum of classical music. In the Concert Classics Series, 25-year-old piano star Daniil Trifonov's Princeton debut alongside his teacher Sergei Babayan in October will give way in the spring to the return of legendary pianist Murray Perahia. Metropolitan Opera favorite Jamie Barton, "opera's nose-studded rock star" (The New York Times) will offer an intimate debut recital in Richardson Auditorium before the 25-voice Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir fills the Princeton University Chapel a few months later.

 

 

A return of last season's favorites includes Christian Tetzlaff, joining his long-time friend Pamela Frank in a rare recital of violin duos, family concerts for youngsters 3-6 ("Baby Got Bach") and kids 6-12 ("Meet the Music"), as well as the cutting-edge PUC125: Performances Up Close initiative with audience seated onstage around the performers in casual, hour-long concerts. In collaboration with artists from other fields—including Adobe Creative Resident designer Craig Winslow—this season PUC125 will expand its scope. At each of the four concerts in the series, the Richardson stage will undergo a transformation unique to each particular program. The curated multimedia environment promises to heighten and extend the listener's experience of the music in this fusion of art forms. Single tickets for these concerts will be available two months before each concert. At this time, tickets to violinist Augustin Hadelich and guitarist Pablo Sáinz Villegas' "Histoire du Tango" program on September 29, 2016 are now released online.

 

 

For a complete listing of concerts visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org.

 

 

SINGLE TICKET PRICES

 

 

Concert Classics Series Concerts – 9 Thursday Nights

 

 

Jamie Barton, mezzo-soprano; Belcea String Quartet; Sergei Babayan, piano & Daniil Trifonov, piano; Takács String Quartet (2 concerts); Estonian Philharmonic Chamber Choir; Hagen String Quartet; Pamela Frank, violin & Christian Tetzlaff, violin; Murray Perahia, piano.
$50, $40, $25 general / $10 students with valid ID

 

 

PUC125 Series – 4 pairs of one-hour concerts presented in the round on the Richardson stage of Alexander Hall

 

Augustin Hadelich, violin & Pablo Sáinz Villegas guitar; Colin Currie, percussion; Benjamin Bagby, voice/anglo-saxon harp; Pekka Kuusisto, violin & Nico Muhly, piano.
$25 general / $10 student

 

 

Beethoven Up Close Series – performed by Takács Quartet, hosted by Princeton Professor Emeritus Scott Burnham

 

 

While two of the concerts in the Beethoven Complete String Quartet Cycle are part of the Concert Classics Series, the remaining four are presented in an intimate in-the-round setup.

 

 

$40 general / $10 student

 

 

Special Event
Béla Fleck, banjo & Abigail Washburn, banjo/voice

 

 

$40 general / $15 students

 

 

Family Concerts – 2 Concerts
$10 adults / $5 kids, buy both and save 20% off single ticket prices

 

 

Richardson Chamber Players 3 Sunday afternoon concerts featuring Princeton's resident ensemble of performance faculty, distinguished guest artists and supremely talented students  
$15 general / $5 student

 

 

HOW TO BUY SINGLE TICKETS:

 

 

ONLINE
princetonuniversityconcerts.org

 

 

BY PHONE, as of Tuesday, September 6, 2016
609-258-9220

 

 

IN PERSON
Frist Campus Center Ticket Office (open Monday-Saturday, 11am-5pm), after September 6, 2016

 

 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICES (the best deal):?

 

 

Concert Classics Series - 9 Thursday night concerts, save up to 30%
$310, $255, $140

 

 

Make Your Own Series
Choose 3 or more different concerts from all of our offerings, except PUC125, and save 10% off single ticket prices.

 

 

Richardson Chamber Players – 3 Sunday Afternoon Concerts
All subscriptions just $39 or add these concerts to a Classics series for just $24

 

 

HOW TO BUY SUBSCRIPTION TICKETS:

All subscriptions must be bought through the Concert Office. To subscribe, call 609-258-2800 [Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm] or visit princetonuniversityconcerts.org

For further information please contact Dasha Koltunyuk at 609-258-6024 or dkoltuny@princeton.edu

Valid from 08/01/2016 to 10/01/2016

 

Princeton University Concerts

07/22/2009

Valid from 07/22/2009

 

Princeton University Concerts Launches Family Program 'Meet the Music'

08/06/2013

Princeton University Concerts is thrilled to announce that we will be launching a family series, Meet The Music, this season.  Featuring musicians from The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center and hosted by Bruce Adolphe, the series kicks off November 16 at 1PM with "A Trilling Event" at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall.  The program includes music from Telemann, Handel, Bach and more.  In the spring we will present "Leave It To Ludwig" on March 15 at 1PM featuring the music of Beethoven.  More info at:


And a video:

Valid from 08/06/2013 to 11/01/2013

 

Princeton University Concerts Announces Family Concert Novemeber 8 at Richardson Auditorium

10/16/2014

Princeton University Concerts kicks off its Meet The Music Series, a family concert series featuring the world-class musicians of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. The first concert, "The Magical World of Maurice Ravel," will take place on Saturday, November 8, 2014 at 1pm at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. Hosted by Bruce Adolphe, Director of Family Programs at The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, this program tells the story of a young pianist who is struggling to play a piece by Ravel. The pianist has a dream in which the composer himself appears and explains the musical mysteries of his magical-sounding music. Will the young pianist play better upon awakening? Find out what happens—and learn the secrets of Ravel's entrancing music. Featuring chamber music by Ravel. This concert is recommended for kids ages 6 and up.

"Through these interactive concerts, we aim to sow the seeds of curiosity and help grow the next generation of concertgoers," said PUC Director Marna Seltzer. "We want to offer young people something memorable and unique – a transformative musical experience. And we want these concerts to be accessible to everyone. For that reason, ticket prices are family friendly – just $10 for adults and $5 for children." Last year's Meet The Music concerts sold out very quickly. We encourage patrons to purchase tickets early.

 

In conjunction with this concert, PUC has collaborated with the Arts Council of Princeton's Art & Music mini-camp "Music, Magic, and Mixed Media Mash-up!", which will take place November 6 & 7 (during the NJEA fall break) from 9am-3:30pm. For more information about the mini-camp, please visit artscouncilofprinceton.org.

 

THE ARTISTS
Bruce Adolphe, Host and Maurice Ravel
Anna Polonsky, Piano
Katie Hyun, Violin
Jessica Lee, Violin

Mark Holloway, Viola
Nicholas Canellakis, Cello
 

The next concert in the Meet The Music series, "Inspector Pulse Pops a String," will take place on Saturday, March 21, 2015 at 1PM.
 

ABOUT MEET THE MUSIC
"Meet the Music" seeks to spark a life-long love of music that will begin the moment a child "meets the music" in person in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall. Kids (suggested ages six and up) will embrace the joys of classical chamber music in this renowned program of The Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, hosted by composer Bruce Adolphe, Director of Family Programs at CMSLC. A 21st Century embodiment of composer/educator Leonard Bernstein and comedian/performer Victor Borge, Adolphe makes the discovery -- or rediscovery -- of chamber music a hoot for the whole family.

For further information please contact Catherine Ugolini at 609-258-6024 or cugolini@princeton.edu ###

 

Valid from 10/16/2014 to 11/09/2014

 

Princeton University Concerts Announces Creative Reactions Contest Winners

04/14/2015

Dedicated to the memory of Vera Sharpe Kohn

 

In January 2015, Princeton University Concerts announced a new initiative, the Creative Reactions Contest - a writing contest designed to foster reflection on the impact of hearing classical music, as perceived by students on Princeton's campus.  Over the course of 2 months, 130 students attended 5 different concerts and were asked to capture the experience of hearing live classical music. The form was flexible allowing for blank verse, prose, poetry, narrative, even lyrics.  We are pleased to announce, from a full field of entries, there were 5 winners.  The first place winner, Susannah Sharpless, class of 2015, has won $1000.  Two second-place winners, Trevor Klee, class of 2015 and Lucas Mazzotti, class of 2017 have won $500. The final panel of judges also awarded two honorable mentions to sophomores Benjamin Goodman and Rachel Stone

 

The winning reactions reflect a wide range of writing, from a piece of poetry that reflects on the use of space and time in music to a truly original short story about a boy who lives in a swamp in Florida and can stop time. Marna Seltzer, Director of Princeton University Concerts, says "The entries were all impressive.  I am astounded by the range of talent at Princeton. Most importantly, though, the pieces make clear that the music we present can and does have a profound effect on students.  None of the winners had ever been to one of our concerts and, in most cases, had very little experience with classical music.  I hope that this shows that one need not have any prior knowledge to attend a concert and be inspired by classical music."

 

The entries were read anonymously in three rounds by 11 judges:

 

Round One:

Marna Seltzer, Director of Princeton University Concerts

Darya Koltunyuk '15, Chair of the Student Ambassadors of Princeton University Concerts

Marue Walizer, Chair of the Princeton University Concerts Committee

 

Round Two:

Mike Gehret, Member of the Princeton University Concerts Committee

Jim Haba, Founding Director of Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Program and Biennial Poetry Festival

Steve Lestition, Dean of Mathey College at Princeton University

Steven Runk, Director of Communications for the Lewis Center for the Arts

Dorothea von Moltke, Owner of Labyrinth Bookshop

 

Round Three:

Susanna Berger, Perkins-Cotsen Postdoctoral Fellow in the Society of Fellows and Lecturer in the Department of Art and Archaeology and in the Council of the Humanities

Scott Burnham, William H. Scheide Professor of Music History at Princeton

C.K. Williams, Poet and Emeritus Professor of Creative Writing at Princeton

 

THE WINNERS

Susannah Sharpless, '15 "Space and Time," inspired by violinist Stefan Jackiw and pianist Anna Polonsky, First Prize, $1000

 

Trevor Klee '15, "Untitled," inspired by pianist Marc-André Hamelin, Second Prize $500

Lucas Mazzotti '17, "Untitled," inspired by the Brentano String Quartet and Joyce DiDonato, Second Prize, $500

 

Benjamin Goodman '17, "Piety," inspired by pianist Marc-André Hamelin, Honorable Mention, $100

Rachel Stone '17, "In B-flat," inspired by Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time," played by violinist Stefan Jackiw and Anna Polonsky, Honorable Mention, $100

 

 

Susannah Sharpless is a senior, graduating in June with a major in Religion and a Certificate in Poetry and Creative Writing.  She comes from a long line of music lovers and has always loved music herself.  When she was younger she studied both piano and cello. Though she listens to music constantly, she has been to very few concerts during her college career.  The experience of hearing music live together with a large audience made a big impression on her. She said it took her a while to figure out what she wanted to write about but, ultimately, she was inspired by the contemporary works on the program (by Witold Lutoslawski, Kaija Sariaaho and especially Olivier Messiaen).  She loves contemporary poetry and found that gave her a way into thinking about the music.

 

Trevor Klee is majoring in Geosciences.  He is writing his thesis on the Earth's crust and will graduate this June.  Though he has taken several creative writing classes at Princeton, this is the first concert he has ever attended.  His family recently moved to Florida and he is just getting to know it.  He finds Florida foreign from Connecticut where he grew up, near a swamp. He thought it would be hard to understand the music but he was transfixed by pianist Marc-André Hamelin.  His seat for the concert was in the far reaches of the balcony surrounded by a number of distractions.  He found himself wanting to be transported to a place where he could be alone with the music. That was the basis for his story.

 

Lucas Mazzotti has not declared a major but is thinking about the Woodrow Wilson School.  He has always loved music, and did quite a bit of singing in high school. He has never studied an instrument but a few years ago he taught himself some basic guitar. His father is a huge fan of classical music and has always hoped that Lucas would grow to appreciate it.  He went to a few concerts when he was younger but this concert was his first at Princeton.  He thought the contest would be a great opportunity to attend his first concert.  He says he has really come to love classical music and his dad is thrilled. We think his father will be really proud when he reads Lucas' profound reaction to this concert.

 

Ben Goodman is majoring in English and Creative Writing (Poetry specifically).  His musical interests are eclectic.  He has a weekly radio show on WPRB on Saturdays from 6-8PM called "Transgenre," and he plays bass guitar casually.  This concert was the first he has been to at Princeton and he was challenged by the idea of writing about classical music, something he knows very little about.  He chose a concert by pianist Marc-André Hamelin because his roommate, a pianist, recommended it.  As fate would have it, he came to a performance with a newly composed work, a piece with many influences and eclectic idioms, which turned out to be an excellent match for Ben's background and interests.

 

Rachel Stone is an English major.  She doesn't play an instrument but she was a pre-professional ballerina before she came to Princeton. Music and the interpretation of it has been something that has preoccupied her poetry. Her entire family on her mother's side is extremely musical.  She feels that what she inherited of this legacy is the ability to interact with music (through dance, through writing).  In her inability to create the music itself, she is drawn toward the closest approximations she can find.  She has never been to a concert at Princeton, and this contest gave her a good excuse. This was the first time she had heard Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time" and found it incredibly powerful without quite knowing the reason for its resonance.  After the concert she decided to do some research. After learning its history, she found that it brought a different sort of urgency to the music, and she wanted to try and write something that could work towards capturing it.  During the concert she knew she wanted to write a poem that addressed music as a tactile thing, as something that could be created through movement, but she didn't want to force this connection. She decided to use the structure of the Quartet to inform the poem.

 

 

ABOUT THE CREATIVE REACTIONS CONTEST

The Creative Reactions Contest is hosted by the Student Ambassadors of PUC, a small group of classical music-loving students whose mission is to increase student interest and participation in Princeton University Concerts programs.  The contest is funded by PUC.  Each year PUC presents a professional concert series featuring renowned classical musicians from all over the world. The Creative Reactions Contest seeks to further PUC's mission by connecting students to the arts and celebrating classical music's unique contributions.  The first Creative Reactions Contest is dedicated to the memory of Vera Sharpe Kohn, a loyal member of the Princeton University Concerts Committee whose support and enthusiasm contributed to the health and well being of Princeton University Concerts.

 

All 5 of the wining entries can be read online by visiting princetonuniversityconcerts.org. For more information or press inquiries, contact Marna Seltzer at seltzer@princeton.edu or at 609-258-4237.

 

Valid from 04/14/2015 to 06/14/2015

 

Princeton University Concerts

07/22/2009

Valid from 07/22/2009




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