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Recycling In The Garden: Recycling In The Garden

04/02/2009

Authors: Anthony Tripp

The average American in 2006 generated 4.6 pounds of solid waste per day, or 251 million tons total according to the EPA. Here are 20 ideas on how you might lessen your own waste generation by recycling waste from your home and garden, back into the garden.

1. Egg cartons can be used to start seedlings. The paper ones are best, as the sections can be separated and planted directly in the ground where they will decompose.

2. Want to start a batch of seedlings? Save up those “clam shell” containers burgers often are served in at fast food stores. Again, make sure you poke holes or make slits in the bottom for water to drain. This is key to keeping seedlings from rotting.

3. Kits are available to make your own “paper pots” from newspapers and the like, in which to start seedlings. Check online or at your local full service garden store.

4. Before throwing any object out that might hold soil, consider if you could use it for a plant pot. We did this at home with a discarded silver coffee urn from a recycle center that had a broken leg and spigot. Boots, wheelbarrows, wagons, maple sugar cans, milk urns, wicker baskets, and even toilets are some of the broken items I’ve seen used for planters. If objects are metal, old and rusty, consider painting them.

5. Objects that are broken but not able to hold soil might be used to decorate the garden. Old lawn furniture, metal bed frames (to make a “garden bed”), and broken garden tools can be sprayed bright or decorative colors. I’ve even seen an old pickup truck painted and planted!

6. Attractive glass bottles such as for wine (even some beer) might be used for vases. In one garden I saw a “stream’ simulated with a meandering strip of green beer bottles on their sides!

7. Glass jars can be used to store seed packs, or individual seeds if small jars (such as baby food jars). If you do canning or save produce such as beans, reuse glass jars for these.

8. Hang used aluminum pie pans and defective or unwanted CDs near the garden and fruit trees. Their shiny movement in the breeze helps deter birds from feeding.

9. Save aluminum foil to place among plants in the garden. The reflected light (assuming the plants aren’t too close to allow sunlight in) often repels aphids.

10. Lay whole sections of newspaper (many layers of paper), or cardboard, in the garden, covered with a light layer of organic mulch for moisture retention and weed control. Wet the paper first in a bucket for ease of laying, especially on windy days.

11. Start a compost pile if you don’t have one, as 25 percent or more of yard waste is compostable on average. There are many attractive barrels and bins if you don’t have room for or want an unsightly pile. Wood pallets can be stood on their sides and tied together to make a compost bin. I staple an old tarp or permeable weed fabric to the inside of mine to keep the compost inside.

12. In many areas of the country grass clippings are collected from lawns and hauled off to landfills. Mow regularly, and with mulching-type mowers, and you wont even see the clippings yet they will add valuable nutrients and organic matter back to soils.

13. Compost leaves at home if you have the space. Shredding first with a lawn mower helps them break down faster. You can use these shredded leaves as mulch, too. I simply make a three foot high pile of leaves each fall on a cleaned up vegetable garden, covered with poultry wire mesh so they wont blow away. They pack down by spring, and over the years have made a nice loam beneath. I plant hills of melons and squash in this area, with virtually no weeding needed.

14. Watch your neighborhood and recycle center for old storm windows that can be used for coldframes, or just propped up to protect seedlings from frost and rough weather. Torn or old window screens can be used as shading for seedlings and pots in a “holding area” or coldframe.

15. Old Venetian blinds can be cut into strips and used for plant labels.

16. Old sheets, tarps, and shower curtains can be used to protect trunks from dirt when hauling plants, to place under your potting area to catch falling soil, or as frost protection for plants. I use them to move mulch and soil onto when I am planting in an established garden.

17. Save old tool and broom handles, umbrella frames, even bicycle rims for staking plants. Mount the bicycle rims horizontally, one on the ground and one above on a post, then run strings between them for vines.

18. Cut strips of old clothing and stockings to tie plants to supports and not harm stems.

19. Tires can be stacked and filled with soil for raised beds. I’ve seen this especially recommended for potatoes. Paint the tires to make them more decorative.

20. Use old garden catalogs and magazines to cut out photos to make notecards, decorate a garden journal, laminate into book markers, paste onto old grocery bags for book covers, to cover indoor pots, or even to make a garden pinnata.

 

Recycling Centers: Recycling Centers

11/07/2007

 

Princeton Merchants Association (PMA) launches Town-wide Plastic Bag Reduction, Reuse, and Recycling Effort

07/27/2015

(Princeton, New Jersey, July 24, 2015) -  The Princeton Merchants Association (PMA), in collaboration with local merchants, nonprofits and the Municipality of Princeton, has launched a single use plastic bag reduction campaign for the community.

 

“Learning our ABC’s” will encourage the reduction, reuse and recycling of single use plastic bags.  The effort will encourage merchants to “Ask First” if customers need a bag, encourage residents to “Bring Your Own Bag” (BYOB) and encourage the use of bins throughout town and homes for our residents and businesses to “Collect and Recycle” plastic bags. 

 

Spearheaded by PMA, current participants include McCaffrey’s Food Market, the Princeton University Store, the Whole Earth Center, Craft Cleaners, Sustainable Princeton, the Princeton Senior Resource Center and the Municipality of Princeton.

 

“PMA is very pleased to offer this solution to the community and we look forward to working with our members and non-members to raise awareness around the importance of reducing and recycling single use plastic bags, film and wrap,” said John Marshall, President of the Princeton Merchant’s Association.

 

The purpose of “Learning our ABC’s” is to reduce the amount of single use bags and plastic films sent to the landfill. The effort follows the best landfill waste reduction strategy by emphasizing reduction first, then reuse, and lastly, recycling. 

 

The Princeton University Store and McCaffrey’s are currently the only locations for public collection and recycling of single use plastic bags.  Utilizing Trex Recycling via McCaffrey’s, this effort will initially place up to ten new containers at convenient locations around town.  More importantly it allows for collection and recycling of more than just single use plastic shopping bags. Residents will also be able to recycle newspaper bags, bread bags, food storage bags and other plastic film such as dry cleaning bags and that which holds bulk items together.  To encourage at-home recycling, McCaffrey’s will soon be selling BagSavR receptacles, which shoppers can use to collect plastics to bring back to any local collection container. Shoppers at McCaffrey’s can save $2 on a BagSavR when they bring in two full “bags of bags” back for recycling.                                                                                                                                                              

                                                                                                                       

“We are very pleased to partner with PMA and others on this innovative program to reduce the number of single use plastic bags given to customers and to encourage residents to bring their own bags.  Our curbside recycle program does not recycle plastic bags because they get caught in the machinery and eventually end up in the landfill.  

 

By increasing the number of plastic bag recycle containers around town we will reduce what would otherwise end up in our landfill,” said Diane M. Landis, Executive Director of Sustainable Princeton 

PMA hopes to showcase Princeton as a model for voluntary bag reduction, and hopes that "Learning our ABC’s” might quickly expand to our neighboring municipalities, state, and nation.  

More info: http://www.princetonmerchants.org/ask-first-byob/

 

Valid from 07/27/2015 to 09/27/2015

 

Mercer County Introduces Recycling App for Smartphones

01/19/2013

 

If you are one of the growing number of people who have a smartphone or tablet, you can download a Mercer County App that puts recycling and special waste collection details and more at your fingertips, anytime you want them.

 

“Mercer County is pleased to announce that we’ve just launched a mobile app that contains all of the information people need to know, tailored specifically to their neighborhoods, about our residential recycling services,” said Mercer County Executive Brain M. Hughes.

 

Called ‘my-waste’, the app lets mobile device users download the full range of information that is normally on the Mercer County Improvement Authority’s website including residents’ collection schedule. Residents who reside in towns that participate in the Mercer County Recycling Program don’t have to go hunting for the printed schedule or be sitting in front of their computers. Instead, by downloading ‘my-waste’™, residents can check details for regular and special collections, and events for household hazardous waste or e-waste days, and more. 

 

Special features of the Mercer County ‘my-waste’ App include a search function that lets residents quickly find information about what to do with a regular or out-of-the-ordinary item.  “The Mercer County ‘my-waste’ App also includes a special ‘report-a-problem’ function that allows residents to report non-emergency problems like missed collections and illegal dumping,” said Phillip S. Miller, Executive Director of the Mercer County Improvement Authority. “The report-a-problem feature uses the smartphone’s GPS positioning system and built-in camera. All they have to do is select the report-a-problem function, take a picture and the problem is automatically e-mailed to us. In coming months, we anticipate adding more special features as well as including useful countywide information.” 

 

The Mercer County ‘my-waste’ download is free. Residents can get it by going to www.my-waste.mobi/NJ-Mercercounty and then select the icon link either to the iPhone/iPad or Android App store. The ‘my-waste’ version for the BlackBerry is coming when RIM releases its new operating system, expected in early 2013.

 

 “Once residents have downloaded the app, they can set it up to give them regular reminders for any of the collection programs,” said Dan Napoleon, Chief of Recycling for MCIA. “For example, they can set a reminder for the day that recycling is collected or they can set up alerts just for household hazardous or electronic waste collection days.

 

“This is a new way for us to connect with residents about our resource recovery and waste diversion programs. We’ll be able to update the information on the app as necessary during the year, so it will always be current. Residents will never forget a collection day and that should lead to increased recycling rates. Everybody wins,” he said. 

 

Mercer County is adding the ‘my-waste’ App to its communication outreach activities. It will continue to distribute printed materials and have information on the website for residents who prefer traditional promotional and educational materials.  For more information, please call the Mercer County Improvement Authority at (609) 278-8100 or visit www.mcia-nj.com

 

 

 

Valid from 01/19/2013 to 02/28/2013

 

Dire Need for Recycling Volunteers at Communiversity!!!

04/23/2012

HELP US AND...
YOU WILL GET A BEAUTIFUL TEE-SHIRT (thanks to the generosity of CRAFT CLEANERS!)
THAT SAYS PRINCETON RECYCLES...

WE HAVE 50 RECYCLE BINS TO BE PLACED NEXT TO EVERY TRASH CAN...
WE JUST NEED 50 VOLUNTEERS TO HELP US MAKE RECYCLING A REALITY AT COMMUNIVERSITY FOR THE FIRST TIME IN ITS HISTORY...

WE ARE EXPECTING 40,000 PEOPLE IN TOWN THIS SATURDAY...AND MANY OF THEM ARE HAVING SO MUCH FUN THEY IGNORE THE RECYCLE BINS AND THROW THEIR BOTTLES AND CANS INTO THE TRASH...
WHICH GOES DIRECTLY TO THE LANDFILL...

PLEASE GIVE US AN HOUR OF YOUR TIME...

CONTACT: dlandis@princeton-township.nj.us and sign up!

Valid from 04/23/2012 to 04/29/2012

 

2014 Recycling & Hazardous Waste Dates

12/15/2013

2014 Recycling Dates have been posted.
http://www.princetonnj.gov/notices/2014_Recycle_Dates.pdf

 

2014 Mercer County Hazardous Waste Event dates have been posted.
Click here for the dates

 

Valid from 12/15/2013 to 12/31/2014

 

Borough Notification System - Recycling

07/02/2010

 BOROUGH RECYCLING will occur as scheduled on Monday July 5th, 2010 

Borough Hall will be closed Monday in observance of Independence Day

 

 

 
 
 
 
Borough of Princeton
PO Box 390
One Monument Drive
Princeton, New Jersey  08542
Office (609) 924-3118
Fax (609) 924-9714

Valid from 07/02/2010 to 07/06/2010

 

Princeton Recycling

07/22/2009

Valid from 07/22/2009

 

Littlebrook School Wins TREX Recycling Challenge

04/22/2016

 

Littlebrook School has won first place in the statewide TREX Recycling Challenge for their efforts in recycling after a year-long effort in collecting, weighing and transporting 720 pounds of plastic, the equivalent of 58,000 plastic bags.

 

Moving beyond merely teaching and learning about recycling, students, staff and parents at Littlebrook Elementary School decided to step up and take action at the beginning of the year.

 

"All year, we've had the pleasure of watching children arrive with large bags of plastic in their arms and huge grins on their faces," said Littlebrook Principal Annie Kosek. "They've loved doing their part to help out the environment, ensuring that these plastics avoid the landfill and instead get recycled."

 

As a result, the school has been awarded a new TREX bench, made from recycled lumber and plastics -- precisely the plastics the students have been collecting. These include all kinds of bags and films like shopping, grocery, bread, cereal, dry-cleaning, and ziploc bags, as well as carton overwrap, newspaper sleeves and bubble wrap. Furthermore, simply for their participation in the Challenge, the school also received a TREX planter box. Both will soon welcome students and staff at the main entrance.

 

Clearly, there's pride in winning an award, but Science Teacher Martha Friend said it was a little tricky to balance the idea of a competition with the actual goal of environmentalism. "Early on, we were surprised to hear students wondering if their parents should start buying more plastics so we could collect more," explained Friend, who led the efforts within the school. "So, we just continuously reminded the kids that our true goal was to help the Earth. Winning the competition was exciting, but it couldn't be the main goal."


 

"And that idea really caught on," Friend said. "Simply continuing to use plastic in this quantity is not our endgame. Now that we've built awareness about all of the plastics we are consuming, the next step at Littlebrook is to promote reduction. After all, with recent reports that bits of plastic are filling our oceans and even creeping into our sea salts and other foods we consume, the time to act is now."


 

"The Littlebrook community is clearly eager to do more to help out the environment, so it's wonderful that TREX gave us the opportunity to participate," said Kosek. "But perhaps the most amazing thing about this project is just how successful it's been."

 

Friend and parent volunteer Jenny Ludmer reached out to others in the community and readily found several willing partners. ACME of Lawrenceville collected shopping bags from their clients, while two Princeton restaurants -- George's Roasters & Ribs and Slice Between -- focused on collecting the overwrap from their incoming packages. Furthermore, Princeton Radiology started saving the plastic bags that encase mammogram gowns.


 

Although the Challenge has ended, the team will continue recycling and hopes it spreads. "We will keep a bin at Littlebrook, but anyone in the area can drop all of these plastics at Target or McCaffrey's too," reported Ludmer. "And next year, hopefully other schools and organizations will sign up to participate in the Challenge."


 

"If one little elementary school managed to collect the equivalent of about 58,000 plastic bags and save them from the landfill, imagine what the whole community could be doing," she concluded.




 

For more information:


 

Valid from 04/22/2016 to 06/01/2016

 

Recycling Centers: Recycling Centers

11/07/2007

Valid from 07/20/2009

 

Recycling In The Garden: Recycling In The Garden

04/02/2009

Authors: Anthony Tripp

The average American in 2006 generated 4.6 pounds of solid waste per day, or 251 million tons total according to the EPA. Here are 20 ideas on how you might lessen your own waste generation by recycling waste from your home and garden, back into the garden.

1. Egg cartons can be used to start seedlings. The paper ones are best, as the sections can be separated and planted directly in the ground where they will decompose.

2. Want to start a batch of seedlings? Save up those “clam shell” containers burgers often are served in at fast food stores. Again, make sure you poke holes or make slits in the bottom for water to drain. This is key to keeping seedlings from rotting.

3. Kits are available to make your own “paper pots” from newspapers and the like, in which to start seedlings. Check online or at your local full service garden store.

4. Before throwing any object out that might hold soil, consider if you could use it for a plant pot. We did this at home with a discarded silver coffee urn from a recycle center that had a broken leg and spigot. Boots, wheelbarrows, wagons, maple sugar cans, milk urns, wicker baskets, and even toilets are some of the broken items I’ve seen used for planters. If objects are metal, old and rusty, consider painting them.

5. Objects that are broken but not able to hold soil might be used to decorate the garden. Old lawn furniture, metal bed frames (to make a “garden bed”), and broken garden tools can be sprayed bright or decorative colors. I’ve even seen an old pickup truck painted and planted!

6. Attractive glass bottles such as for wine (even some beer) might be used for vases. In one garden I saw a “stream’ simulated with a meandering strip of green beer bottles on their sides!

7. Glass jars can be used to store seed packs, or individual seeds if small jars (such as baby food jars). If you do canning or save produce such as beans, reuse glass jars for these.

8. Hang used aluminum pie pans and defective or unwanted CDs near the garden and fruit trees. Their shiny movement in the breeze helps deter birds from feeding.

9. Save aluminum foil to place among plants in the garden. The reflected light (assuming the plants aren’t too close to allow sunlight in) often repels aphids.

10. Lay whole sections of newspaper (many layers of paper), or cardboard, in the garden, covered with a light layer of organic mulch for moisture retention and weed control. Wet the paper first in a bucket for ease of laying, especially on windy days.

11. Start a compost pile if you don’t have one, as 25 percent or more of yard waste is compostable on average. There are many attractive barrels and bins if you don’t have room for or want an unsightly pile. Wood pallets can be stood on their sides and tied together to make a compost bin. I staple an old tarp or permeable weed fabric to the inside of mine to keep the compost inside.

12. In many areas of the country grass clippings are collected from lawns and hauled off to landfills. Mow regularly, and with mulching-type mowers, and you wont even see the clippings yet they will add valuable nutrients and organic matter back to soils.

13. Compost leaves at home if you have the space. Shredding first with a lawn mower helps them break down faster. You can use these shredded leaves as mulch, too. I simply make a three foot high pile of leaves each fall on a cleaned up vegetable garden, covered with poultry wire mesh so they wont blow away. They pack down by spring, and over the years have made a nice loam beneath. I plant hills of melons and squash in this area, with virtually no weeding needed.

14. Watch your neighborhood and recycle center for old storm windows that can be used for coldframes, or just propped up to protect seedlings from frost and rough weather. Torn or old window screens can be used as shading for seedlings and pots in a “holding area” or coldframe.

15. Old Venetian blinds can be cut into strips and used for plant labels.

16. Old sheets, tarps, and shower curtains can be used to protect trunks from dirt when hauling plants, to place under your potting area to catch falling soil, or as frost protection for plants. I use them to move mulch and soil onto when I am planting in an established garden.

17. Save old tool and broom handles, umbrella frames, even bicycle rims for staking plants. Mount the bicycle rims horizontally, one on the ground and one above on a post, then run strings between them for vines.

18. Cut strips of old clothing and stockings to tie plants to supports and not harm stems.

19. Tires can be stacked and filled with soil for raised beds. I’ve seen this especially recommended for potatoes. Paint the tires to make them more decorative.

20. Use old garden catalogs and magazines to cut out photos to make notecards, decorate a garden journal, laminate into book markers, paste onto old grocery bags for book covers, to cover indoor pots, or even to make a garden pinnata.

Valid from 07/20/2009 to 02/21/2011

 

NEW VENDORS, NEW RECYCLING OPPORTUNITIES AT THE PENNINGTON FARMERS MARKET

08/08/2011

There’s always something new at the Pennington Farmers Market.  In July, two new vendors joined the Market – Nine Acre Farm and HerbNZest; and the Solutions Corner announced the expansion of their recycling activities to include foam egg cartons, pantyhose, and used golf balls.  You can learn about these and other activities at the new Market website, which also launched in July:  www.PenningtonFarmersMarket.com

Nine Acre Farm participated in the Farmers Market in its first year, but the adverse weather conditions of 2010 ruined the sunflower crop, so they missed last season.  Now Sonya Sappington is back with her stunning sunflowers and selling out every weekend.

HerbNZest is a new company offering fruit and vegetable spreads made from simple natural ingredients enhanced by a pairing of herbs and spices.  At the Market each week you can try free samples of their Chive Tomato Mustard Spread and the Basil Peach Raisin Spread. Founder, Deboleena Dutta, has enjoyed the Pennington Farmers Market experience and praised it for “the market's spirit created by a combination of vendors, events, music and customers!”

The Solutions Corner at the Farmers Market addresses a wide range of environmental problems and suggests simple ways that each of us can address these issues.  Foremost among these problems is the shocking amount of material that is dumped in landfills, with one solution being the recycling of more materials to keep them from becoming trash.  Pennington Farmers Market customers are adept at sorting materials at home to be placed at the curbside for pick up (paper, cardboard, glass, cans, and #1 and #2 plastics).  But that still leaves a lot of material in the trash can.  So, at the Farmers Market there is a collection of #5 plastics (yogurt containers, flower pots, and lots of other hard plastics) on the last Saturday of the month.  These materials are sent to Preserve, a company that turns this material into kitchenware and other long-lasting products.  The Market has also been collecting wine bottle corks to be made into cork tiles.

Now the recycling effort is being expanded.  Joann Held, Solutions Corner manager, announced, “Beginning in August new materials are being added to the list of recyclables at the Pennington Farmers Market.  In addition to the #5 plastics and wine bottle corks, we will be collecting pantyhose, foam egg cartons, and used golf balls.  Bring them to the Market on the last Saturday of each month, and we will make sure they are recycled into new and useful products.”

 

For Vendor information, contact Jenni Spencer (Market Manager) at (609) 647-8240; for Recycling information contact Joann Held (Solutions Corner) at (609) 737-0867.

#     #     #

 

The mission of the Pennington Farmers Market is to provide growers and producers within fifty miles of Pennington, New Jersey an opportunity to sell directly to the public; to promote the nutritional, environmental, and community health benefits of sustainable living; and to create a unique atmosphere in which to appreciate the agriculture, arts, culture, and character of Hopewell Valley.

 

Valid from 08/08/2011 to 09/01/2011

 

Recycling Week at Pennington Farmer's Market

06/22/2014

On the last Saturday of every month, the Market collects #5 plastics, wine bottle corks (real, not synthetic), styrofoam egg cartons, and CDs/DVDs.  

As always, the Market will offer a wide variety of fresh vegetables, fruits, bread, wine, meats and dairy, desserts and crafts all produced within 50 miles of Pennington.  This week they will also host three special guests:  a massage therapist, an acupuncturist, and an herbalist.  There will be live music by the Brian Yank Jazz Trio.

The Pennington Farmers Market is open Saturdays 9-1, June-October on the lawn at Rosedale Mills (101 Route 31 North in Hopewell Township).  To find out more, sign up for the weekly email at PenningtonFarmersMarket@gmail.comvisit penningtonfarmersmarket.org, find them on Facebook, or follow them on Twitter 

 

Valid from 06/22/2014 to 07/01/2014

 

Recycling

05/17/2010

Valid from 05/17/2010




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